First Draft - Politics and War

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April 28, 2022
By Dave Walker, communication strategist

An iconic character's World War II service and its meaning to postwar audiences.




January 21, 2022
By THNOC Visitor Services

Ever wanted to take New Orleans History 101? While no intro course can be comprehensive, we've assembled 13 summaries of major themes, events, people, and places, with lots of links to further reading.




October 29, 2021
Nick Weldon, editor

A mysterious illness took the life of Oscar Dunn, the first Black man to serve as a lieutenant governor in US history. Now, 150 years later, we look back at the circumstances of his death and whether is was murder.




October 8, 2021
By Molly Reid Cleaver, editor

The full extent of the storm’s impact on coastal demographics remains to be seen, but for Louisiana’s indigenous people, it’s another wave in a long saga of forced migration and environmental adaptation going back hundreds of years.




August 27, 2021
By Molly Reid Cleaver, editor

Life in the colony of Mobile was precious, so why did Bienville, the de facto ruler, slash the salary of the only Midwife?




July 23, 2021
By Eli A. Haddow, marketing associate

In the spring of 1942, Hitler brought World War II to Louisiana’s shores, and ships sailing in the Gulf of Mexico paid the price.




May 21, 2021
By Dylan Jordan, interpretation assistant

Today, the term “filibuster” refers to the obstruction of legislative process through long speeches and other delay tactics. For most of the 19th century, however, filibusters were men who engaged in unsanctioned warfare in foreign countries—and a number of their campaigns were planned and set sail from New Orleans. 




March 4, 2021
By Libby Neidenbach, visitor services trainer

By appealing to the highest court in the land, the men behind Plessy v. Ferguson sought to halt the rolling back of major civil rights gains Black people achieved during Reconstruction. Their defeat in 1896 marked the end of an era of radical Black activism in New Orleans that began with the Civil War.




March 2, 2021
By Kendric Perkins, education specialist

The streetcar protest of 1867 is one of the few cases in which African Americans during Reconstruction successfully voiced their dissatisfaction to government officials in the South.




February 18, 2021
By: Jessica Dorman, director of publications

Three new books from THNOC give different viewpoints of the infamous Mechanics' Institute massacre.




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