First Draft - Politics and War

January 18, 2021
By Nick Weldon, associate editor

150 years before Kamala Harris was inaugurated as the nation's first Black vice president, newspapers speculated that Louisianan Oscar J. Dunn could be up for the job.




December 22, 2020
By Teresa Devlin, marketing manager

On November 14, 1960, four six-year-old girls in New Orleans became pioneers in the national civil rights movement. While they were confronted by mobs of protestors in their own neighborhoods, well-wishers from across the country sent cards of encouragement.




December 11, 2020
Visitor Services Department

What does it mean to be Cajun? We explore the roots of this complicated identity through 12 individual stories.




November 17, 2020
By Katherine Jolliff Dunn and Emily Perkins

As New Orleans braces for a vastly downsized Carnival 2021 because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, THNOC is looking back at each cancellation, focusing on what the city was like at that time, the activities of the krewes during the downtime, and the celebrations that did take place despite the shutdown of big parades.




October 21, 2020
Nick Weldon, associate editor

In the first presidential election after the Civil War, violence and voter suppression prevented Black voters from exercising their right. 




October 14, 2020
Margit Longbrake, senior editor

Amid the American Civil War, a new civil rights movement was forming in New Orleans—in French.




September 18, 2020
By Dhani Adomaitis, Madeline Drace, Michelle Harrison, and Cecilia Hock

For years, cinephiles have lamented a lack of originality coming out of Hollywood studios. However, there’s no shortage of stories waiting to be told onscreen, and that’s where we can be of use to studio bosses.




August 14, 2020
By Libby Neidenbach, visitor services trainer

Often, the story of women’s suffrage ends at the ratification of the 19th Amendment. Yet, for many women in the South, the fight did not end there.




July 17, 2020
By Emily Perkins, curatorial cataloger

A large photograph album bound in red leather documents a 1906 “quarantine tour” of Central America sponsored by the United Fruit Company during the final outbreak of yellow fever in New Orleans. The book is a fascinating example of the tremendous influence of the banana-import business in early 20th-century New Orleans and the efforts by one company to skirt quarantine regulations.




June 12, 2020
By Pamela D. Arceneaux, senior librarian/rare books curator

When the City of New Orleans passed an ordinance to remove black prostitutes from Storyville, Willie Piazza fought back. Her challenge to segregation was an early, though fleeting, victory against Jim Crow.






 

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