History is an evolving story. Here at The Historic New Orleans Collection, we gather, research, and share artifacts from New Orleans’ many stories, weaving together the people, places, and events that connect us to the city. First Draft gives readers inside access to our vast institutional holdings and staff expertise in a fresh and dynamic way. Read the latest stories below, or scroll down to browse by theme.

Pages

January 5, 2022
By Molly Reid Cleaver, editor

Before Sharpe’s invention helped birth the entire signature-throw industry, he sailed around the world, sold paintings, wrote poetry, and studied ancient history.




December 31, 2021
By Dave Walker, communication strategist

Prospect.5 spotlights the intimate eye of George Dureau, photographer




December 30, 2021
By Molly Reid Cleaver, editor

THNOC pays homage to the groundbreaking entertainer and radio host, who passed away in August 2021.




December 22, 2021
By Molly Reid Cleaver, editor

The photographer and art-world star makes his New Orleans debut at THNOC with a powerful pair of installations for Prospect.5.




December 15, 2021
By Dave Walker, communication strategist

The 8th Cavalry Mexican Military Band was a sensation in 1884 New Orleans. 




December 10, 2021
By Lydia Blackmore, decorative arts curator

Forget public indecency. A 1960s pamphlet shares some timeless advice for catching throws—and we provide some updates for the 21st century.




November 24, 2021
By Xiomara Blanco, Eli A. Haddow, and Jason Wiese

Maps are more than visual representations of landscapes and geographic features; they’re also storytellers. Cartographers imprint their views of the world on the maps they make, leaving significant messages in tiny details.




November 19, 2021
By Cathe Mizell-Nelson

Were our ancestors glued to the mail like we are glued to our phones? The wealth of postcards with pedestrian information suggests that they may have been.




October 29, 2021
Nick Weldon, editor

A mysterious illness took the life of Oscar Dunn, the first Black man to serve as a lieutenant governor in US history. Now, 150 years later, we look back at the circumstances of his death and whether is was murder.




October 27, 2021
By Nick Weldon, editor

Norbert Rillieux patented the process of sugar refinement changed the industry, but the free man of color faced racist discrimination from the government and clients.




Pages



 

First Draft Navigation
All Articles