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November 1, 2019
By THNOC staff

THNOC staff members discuss four recent additions to the museum's holdings, each touching on arts and artists in New Orleans.




October 18, 2019
By Lissa Capo

New Orleans actor Sid Noel stepped into one of the most iconic local television roles when he created the mad scientist known as Morgus the Magnificent.




September 6, 2019
By Katherine Jolliff Dunn, collections processor

Born in New Orleans in 1931, Rolland Golden—who passed away in July 2019—spent much of his career as an artist drawing and painting Southern scenes. After serving in the Navy, Golden attended the John McCrady Art School from 1955 to 1957. Those years studying in the French Quarter began a lifelong love for the old buildings and charm of the Vieux Carré.




July 16, 2019
By Eric Seiferth, curator/historian

So much of New Orleans’s musical culture rests on its diversity, of styles, practitioners, and influences. The music of the African diaspora is a big part of this story.




May 3, 2019
By Emily Perkins, curatorial cataloger

Cataloger Emily Perkins looks at some of her favorite Tipitina’s posters and promotional pieces from the Michael P. Smith Collection




May 3, 2019
By Eli A. Haddow, marketing associate

Through unusual posters and interviews with two of Tipitina’s co-founders, we take a look back at the club's early years and their quirky promotional materials.




April 24, 2019
By Michael M. Redmann, manuscripts cataloger

After being hosted for two years in a section of what is now Louis Armstrong Park, the Fest’s growing popularity necessitated a move to the infield of the racetrack at the much larger 145-acre Fair Grounds in 1972. 




March 8, 2019
By Nick Weldon, associate editor

Before its ruins provided scenery for portions of Beyoncé’s visual album “Lemonade,” HBO’s series “True Detective,” or AMC’s “Into the Badlands,” Fort Macomb was considered a crucial line of defense for New Orleans and the country at large.




November 15, 2018
By Sarah Duggan, CIS coordinator and research curator

Some practical furniture from the 19th century shows us how hosts dealt with the same Thanksgiving conundrums we face today.




October 30, 2018
By Sarah Duggan, CIS coordinator and research curator

Making a keepsake out nof a loved one's hair may seem unusual now, but in the 19th century there was a trend to weave human hair into little memorials to the deceased.




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