First Draft - Race and Ethnicity

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June 30, 2022
By THNOC staff

Bruce Sunpie Barnes, Big Chief of the North Side Skull and Bone Gang, describes a Mardi Gras Black masking tradition.




June 17, 2022
By Molly Reid Cleaver, senior editor

Nearly 35 years ago, a heedless conservator drastically changed a rare portrait of a free woman of color. Now, it has been restored and is on view again—and this time, THNOC is telling the story.




May 5, 2022
By Judy Cooper, author-photographer of "Dancing in the Streets: Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs of New Orleans"

From the beginning of Jazz Fest, organizer George Wein sought to showcase culture bearers like Mardi Gras Indians and social aid and pleasure clubs alongside musicians. "Dancing in the Streets" author Judy Cooper shares the history of this "heritage on display."




March 25, 2022
By Nick Weldon, editor

The story of how feral hogs arrived at New Orleans’s doorstep, 500 years in the making.




March 10, 2022
By Molly Reid Cleaver, editor

Across his songs, stories, and interviews, Danny Barker embraced the rhythms and archetypes of African American folklore, using his skills as a writer and storyteller to paint indelible portraits of his own folk creations. Here are excerpts illustrating five of his best characters.




January 21, 2022
By THNOC Visitor Services

Ever wanted to take New Orleans History 101? While no intro course can be comprehensive, we've assembled 13 summaries of major themes, events, people, and places, with lots of links to further reading.




December 22, 2021
By Molly Reid Cleaver, editor

The photographer and art-world star makes his New Orleans debut at THNOC with a powerful pair of installations for Prospect.5.




October 29, 2021
Nick Weldon, editor

A mysterious illness took the life of Oscar Dunn, the first Black man to serve as a lieutenant governor in US history. Now, 150 years later, we look back at the circumstances of his death and whether is was murder.




October 27, 2021
By Nick Weldon, editor

Norbert Rillieux patented the process of sugar refinement changed the industry, but the free man of color faced racist discrimination from the government and clients.




October 8, 2021
By Molly Reid Cleaver, editor

The full extent of the storm’s impact on coastal demographics remains to be seen, but for Louisiana’s indigenous people, it’s another wave in a long saga of forced migration and environmental adaptation going back hundreds of years.




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