First Draft - Race and Ethnicity

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December 22, 2021
By Molly Reid Cleaver, editor

The photographer and art-world star makes his New Orleans debut at THNOC with a powerful pair of installations for Prospect.5.




October 29, 2021
Nick Weldon, editor

A mysterious illness took the life of Oscar Dunn, the first Black man to serve as a lieutenant governor in US history. Now, 150 years later, we look back at the circumstances of his death and whether is was murder.




October 27, 2021
By Nick Weldon, editor

Norbert Rillieux patented the process of sugar refinement changed the industry, but the free man of color faced racist discrimination from the government and clients.




October 8, 2021
By Molly Reid Cleaver, editor

The full extent of the storm’s impact on coastal demographics remains to be seen, but for Louisiana’s indigenous people, it’s another wave in a long saga of forced migration and environmental adaptation going back hundreds of years.




June 24, 2021
By Sarah Duggan, DAGS coordinator and research curator

The work of the Decorative Arts of the Gulf South project has revealed stories of African American material culture throughout the region.




May 11, 2021
By Dave Walker, communication specialist

Access to capture the intimate action of a second line is earned over beers in favorite club watering holes, in the quieter moments that precede and conclude a parade, and during the kinetic events themselves, where unspoken rules of artistic engagement are observed.  




April 23, 2021
By Fatima Shaik, author of "Economy Hall: The Hidden History of a Free Black Brotherhood"

Untold thousands have gathered under the Economy Hall tent at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival to hear traditional local music, but how many have known the history behind the name? 




April 19, 2021
By Dhani Adomaitis, Libby Neidenbach, and Douane Waples

In four videos, we chart the evolution if New Orleans brass bands from their Civil War–era origins up to the modern day.




April 6, 2021
By Margit Longbrake, senior editor

In a series of new videos, New Orleans poets craft 21st-century responses to 19th-century poems.




March 4, 2021
By Libby Neidenbach, visitor services trainer

By appealing to the highest court in the land, the men behind Plessy v. Ferguson sought to halt the rolling back of major civil rights gains Black people achieved during Reconstruction. Their defeat in 1896 marked the end of an era of radical Black activism in New Orleans that began with the Civil War.




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