First Draft - Race and Ethnicity

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April 6, 2021
By Margit Longbrake, senior editor

In a series of new videos, New Orleans poets craft 21st-century responses to 19th-century poems.




March 4, 2021
By Libby Neidenbach, visitor services trainer

By appealing to the highest court in the land, the men behind Plessy v. Ferguson sought to halt the rolling back of major civil rights gains Black people achieved during Reconstruction. Their defeat in 1896 marked the end of an era of radical Black activism in New Orleans that began with the Civil War.




March 2, 2021
By Kendric Perkins, education specialist

The streetcar protest of 1867 is one of the few cases in which African Americans during Reconstruction successfully voiced their dissatisfaction to government officials in the South.




February 24, 2021
By Eric Seiferth, curator/historian

After the Civil War, benevolent associations flourished in New Orleans's Black community, and so did their impact on life in the city.




February 18, 2021
By: Jessica Dorman, director of publications

Three new books from THNOC give different viewpoints of the infamous Mechanics' Institute massacre.




January 20, 2021
By Libby Neidenbach, visitor services trainer

Local circumstances—and tragedies—shaped Black New Orleanians’ successful struggle for the vote, but their fight had far-reaching consequences.




January 19, 2021
By Eli A. Haddow, marketing associate

After the Union liberated New Orleans, Black activists fought for civil liberties and basic human rights.




January 18, 2021
By Nick Weldon, associate editor

150 years before Kamala Harris was inaugurated as the nation's first Black vice president, newspapers speculated that Louisianan Oscar J. Dunn could be up for the job.




December 22, 2020
By Teresa Devlin, marketing manager

On November 14, 1960, four six-year-old girls in New Orleans became pioneers in the national civil rights movement. While they were confronted by mobs of protestors in their own neighborhoods, well-wishers from across the country sent cards of encouragement.




October 21, 2020
Nick Weldon, associate editor

In the first presidential election after the Civil War, violence and voter suppression prevented Black voters from exercising their right. 




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