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November 10, 2022
Story by Kurt Owens, Visitor Services interpreter; video by Xiomara Blanco, media producer

Two great fires destroyed large portions of New Orleans during the city’s Spanish colonial era. The disasters spurred major changes to the cityscape that can still be observed today.




April 21, 2022
By Nick Weldon, editor

A Q&A with Yuts, the pseudonymous creator of the acclaimed indie game Norco, and Richard Sexton, photographer and author of Enigmatic Stream: Industrial Landscapes of the Lower Mississippi River.




October 27, 2021
By Nick Weldon, editor

Norbert Rillieux patented the process of sugar refinement changed the industry, but the free man of color faced racist discrimination from the government and clients.




September 27, 2021
By Lydia Blackmore, Sarah Duggan, and Mallory Taylor

Damage from fire, water, or other natural disasters can ruin possessions and memories. Here are a few tips to rescue damaged items, and advice on when to seek professional help.




September 15, 2021
By Eli A. Haddow, marketing associate

After Hurricane Ida, we spoke with a climatologist to grasp the differences between the two monster hurricanes and compare them with other cataclysmic storms in Louisiana history




August 27, 2021
By Molly Reid Cleaver, editor

Life in the colony of Mobile was precious, so why did Bienville, the de facto ruler, slash the salary of the only Midwife?




June 11, 2021
By Cecilia Hock, Interpretation Assistant

In August 1812, a vicious storm ripped through New Orleans. Using a letter from THNOC’s holdings and the findings of a climatologist, we look at the storm’s toll and how it compares to recent hurricanes.




March 5, 2021
By Mark Cave, senior historian

The first case of COVID-19 in Louisiana was diagnosed on March 9, 2020. As part of its efforts to record this transformative period in our region's history, THNOC is sharing the personal stories of three local leaders from the frontline.




August 3, 2020
By Katherine Jolliff Dunn, cataloger

A new pumping system in the early 20th century improved New Orleans's drainage crisis, decreased disease rates, increased the quality of the water supply, and drove economic growth throughout the city. These improvements, however, came at a mighty cost. 




July 17, 2020
By Emily Perkins, curatorial cataloger

A large photograph album bound in red leather documents a 1906 “quarantine tour” of Central America sponsored by the United Fruit Company during the final outbreak of yellow fever in New Orleans. The book is a fascinating example of the tremendous influence of the banana-import business in early 20th-century New Orleans and the efforts by one company to skirt quarantine regulations.




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