This extensive collection of manuscript documents, rare prints and publications, artifacts, and ephemera was gathered over a period of forty years by private collector William C. Cook of Nashville; it was the largest collection of such materials in private hands prior to its acquisition by THNOC.   Mr. Cook's collection focuses on the War of 1812 in the South, particularly the Creek War, the war in the Gulf of Mexico, and the Battle of New Orleans. Major General Andrew Jackson, military commander during these events, is well represented, and the collection also includes various important U.S. Army and militia documents, as well as materials concerning the participation of the southern Indian tribes and manuscripts from the British perspective. Also present are related materials concerning the War of 1812 in the South from a later date, the largest single grouping of which contains campaign materials from the 1828 presidential election. These principally focus on the 1815 execution of the six militia men that were most dramatically executed in the infamous "Coffin broadsides."  The William C. Cook War of 1812 in the South Collection is growing, and this finding guide will be updated to reflect new items.


Preferred Citation:"The William C. Cook Collection: The War of 1812 in the South, The Williams Research Center, The Historic New Orleans Collection."


Organization: (Click on Series heading to jump to that section)


PHASE 1--Pre-War and Early Events in the War of 1812 (Folders 1-15)

PHASE II--Defense of the Lower Country (Folders 16-36)

PHASE III--The Creek War (Folders 37-69)

PHASE IV-- The Gulf Campaign and the Battle of New Orleans (Folders 70-128)

PHASE V--The Aftermath of the War of 1812 in the South (Folders 129-187)

Coffin Broadsides (Folders 188-204)

Clark Mill's Equestrian Statue of General Andrew Jackson (Folders 205-207)

Pamphlets and Newspapers (Folders 208-220)

Additions (Folders 221-256)

William C. Cook War of 1812 in the South Library



PHASE 1---Pre-War and Early Events in the War of 1812


Documents from this group date from 1809-12, and pertain in particular to early events relating to the War of 1812 in the South. Among the persons represented are: Albert Gallatin (Secretary of the Treasury); Captain Nicholas Lockyer, RN; Puckshunubee (Choctaw chief); Willie Blount (Governor of Tennessee); Capt. Zachary Taylor, 7th Regt., U.S. Infantry; Brig. Gen. James Winchester, U.S. Army; Brig. Gen. William H. Harrison, U.S. Army; Col. William P. Armstrong, Cmdr., 24th Regt.; and others.

Folder 1. Letter from Albert Gallatin (Secretary of the Treasury) to Joseph Wilson, Port Collector, Marblehead, MA. 1809 Jan. 16. Directions to arm and employ vessel. Signed. 2 pp. 1 item

Folder 2. Receipt of payment made out to Lt. Simeon Knight, District Paymaster, New Orleans from Lt. Washington Lee, Paymaster, 5th Regiment U.S. Infantry, Natchez, MS Territory. 1810 Dec. 3. Signed: Washington Lee LT., Paymaster. Additional notes added by later owner. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 3. Ship's log of HM Brig Sophie, Capt. Nicholas Lockyer, RN, Commanding Officer. 1810 Nov. 11-1811 Apr. 9. During this period, the ship was assigned to the English Channel Patrol blockading French ports. 77 pp. 1 item.

Folder 4. Letter from Puckshunubee (Choctaw Chief) to James Innerarity, Partner John Forbes & Company, Mobile, MS Territory. 1811 Oct. 14. Re: trading and a desire for peace. Signed: Puckshunubbee. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 5. Letter from Willie Blount (Governor of Tennessee) to President James Madison. 1811 Dec. 24. Acknowledging receipt of his correspondence and reiteration of Tennessee's strong support for the administration's position regarding Great Britain. Signed: Willie Blount. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 6. Affidavit of William Cocke (Agent for the Choctaw Nation). 1812 Apr. 9. Concerns legal proceedings in a Tennessee case which ultimately lead to Cocke's removal to the Mississippi Territory. Signed William Cocke; sworn before and signed by William's son Thomas Cocke. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 7. Receipt from Capt. Zachary Taylor (7th Regiment U.S. Infantry) for equipment from James Wilson, U.S. Agent at Newport, KY, to ferry troops. 1812 Apr. 9. Signed: Z. Taylor Capt., 7th Regt. U.S. Inft. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 8. Letter from B. Genl. James Winchester (U.S. Army) to Maj. Edmund P. Gaines, Recruiting officer, 24th Regiment of Infantry, U.S. Army. 1812 May 6. Re: commencing the recruiting service in East Tennessee. Signed: Winchester BGenl, United States Army. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 9. Fragment of letter from B. Genl. Thomas Johnson (Cmdg., 6th Brigade of the West TN Militia). [1812 May]. Concerning the incursion of the Chickasaw Indians at Sandy River [TN]. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 10. Instructions for the Private Armed Vessels of the United States. [1812 July]. Printed form intended for all U.S. Customs Collectors, authorizing the vessel whose name and captain's name were to be filled in, to act as privateers. Signed in print by Jas. Monroe, Secretary of State. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 11. Letter from B.Genl. James Winchester (U.S. Army) to Maj. Edmund P. Gaines, Recruiting Officer, 24th Regiment of Infantry, U.S. Army. 1812 Aug. 3. Concerns orders to take command of all the officers of the U.S. Army in East Tennessee, excepting Capt. F. W. Armstrong. Signed: Winchester B.Genl., U.S. Army. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 12. Letter from B.Genl. James Winchester (U.S. Army) to Lt. James Bryson, QMG's Department, Newport, KY. 1812 Aug. 12. Countermands a previous order to provide transportation for the baggage of 1100 troops on the march to Detroit. Signed: Winchester. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 13. Letter from B.Genl. William H. Harrison (U.S. Army) to Governor Isaac Shelby of Kentucky. 1812 Aug. 29. Requests troops to accompany a shipment of specie. Signed: William Henry Harrison. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 14. Signed cover, Col. William P. Anderson (Cmdg. 24th Regiment of U.S. Infantry). [1812] Sept. 15. Nashville, TN postmark. Addressed to Adjutant General, U.S. Army, Thomas H. Cushing. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 15. Letter from Col. William P. Anderson (Cmdg., 24th Regiment of U.S. Infantry), to Lt. Col. Edmund P. Gaines, second in Command, 24th Regiment of U.S. Army. 1812 Oct. 23. Col. Anderson requests that Lt. Col. Gaines assume the orders he received from Gen. [William Henry] Harrison regarding the marching of East TN troops to join Maj. Genl. Harrison. Signed: W. P. Anderson, with initialed postscript. 2 pp. 1 item.

 

PHASE II--Defense of the Lower Country


These materials relate principally to the abortive Natchez expedition of the Tennessee Militia under command of Maj. Andrew Jackson. Governor Blount issued orders for the expedition in November 1812 and Jackson departed for the Mississippi Territory in January 1813. Jackson's troops arrived in Natchez in February, only to be told by the Secretary of War, John Armstrong, that their services were no longer needed. The force returned to Tennessee in late March 1813. It was during this return march that Jackson earned the nickname "Old Hickory" by walking the entire distance to allow the sick to ride his horse. Materials include general orders, requisitions, provision returns, Col. John Coffee's orderly book, and other related documents.

Folder 16. Letter from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson (TN Militia) to Governor David Holmes of MS Territory. 1813 Jan. 5. Concerns contractors and supplies for his troops that will march in a few days to defend the lower country. Signed: Andrew Jackson. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 17. Order to convene court martial of Private Jesse Boze of Capt. Mallon's Troop of TN Militia Cavalry. 1813 Jan. 5. Ordered by the Major General. Signed by Col. John Coffee, Cmdg. Regiment of TN Militia Cavalry. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 18. General orders from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson for Lt. Col. James Bradley. 1813 Jan. 7. Orders Bradley to commence the march and to issue orders for Maj. James Lauderdale in Col. William Hall's absence to command the 1st Regiment until meeting up with Col. Thomas H. Benton who will have the command until the arrival of Col. Hall. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Jackson has stricken through his signature and penned beneath the signature of his ADC, Andrew Hynes. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 19. Orders by Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson to Assistant Deputy Quarter Master General [ADQMG] William B. Lewis. 1813 Jan. 9. Orders Lewis to pay accounts of individuals who housed Jackson's sick troops. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 20. Secretarial copy of an extract from the Recruiting Instructions of the Office of Thomas H. Cushing, Adjutant General, Washington City. 1813 Jan. 15. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 21. Provision return for troops of Col. William Hall (Cmdg., 1st Regiment Tennessee Volunteers). 1813 Feb. 28. Col. Hall's troops were stationed near Natchez, MS Territory. Endorsement by Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson (signature: Andrew Jackson, Major Gen.). 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 22. Provision return for troops of Col. Thomas H. Benton (Cmdg., 2nd Regiment Tennessee Volunteers). 1813 Mar. 2. Benton's troops were stationed near Natchez, MS Territory. Endorsed by Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson (signature: Andrew Jackson). 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 23. Secretarial copy of letter from John Armstrong (Secretary of War) to Governor Willie Blount [of Tennessee]. 1813 Mar. 9. Concerns military defense of the three western territories and raising the necessary troops. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 24. Recruiting Instructions, Adjutant General's Office, Washington City, signed by Thomas H. Cushing. 1813 Mar. 10. Printed instructions signed by Cushing, the Adjutant General. Signature: T. H. Cushing. Below this, handwritten is Col. Isaac Lane's appointment of Noah Haley, Jr. as a Capt. in the 33rd Regiment of U.S. Infantry. Signed: Isaac Lane. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 25. Provision return for troops of Lt. James Horn (Co. Cmdr., 2nd Regiment Tennessee Volunteers). 1813 Mar. 14. For troops returning to Nashville. Endorsed by Col. William Hall, Cmdg., 2nd Regiment Tennessee Militia (signed: W. Hall) and Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson (signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl.). 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 26. Provision return for troops of Col. John Coffee (Cmdg., Tennessee Mounted Cavalry). 1813 Mar. 14. Coffee's troops were returning to Nashville. Signed by Coffee (J. Coffee, Col. Cavalry), endorsed by Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson (signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl.) and docketed by Lt. Basil Shaw, 1st Adj., Tennessee Mounted Cavalry. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 27. Provision return for Capt. William Carroll's Company of Nashville Volunteers. 1813 Mar. 19. Endorsed by Andrew Jackson (signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl.). 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 28. Petition from the Committee of Correspondence for the county of Bristol (MA), Taunton, MA. 1813 Mar. 25. The document, addressed to Dear Sir, advocates a vigorous prosecution of the war against Great Britain and defends America's republican institutions. Signed by seven members of the committee: Marcus [Monton or Mouton?], James L. Hodges, Enos Bunt, Simeon Tisdale, James Godfrey, Ezra Dean, and Noah Chastin, Jr.} County Com.y. of Correspondence. 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 29. Letter from Willie Blount (Governor of Tennessee), Knoxville to Governor Ninian Edwards of Illinois. 1813 Apr. 15. Blount is responding to Secretary of War Armstrong's letter dated 1813 Mar. 9. He indicates concerns about not having received instructions from the Secretary of War about supplying troops and the vulnerability of the western territory. (Signed: Willie Blount.) Note: It is believed the Mar. 9 Armstrong secretarial copy (see folder 23) was enclosed with this letter. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 30. Letter from John L. Glaser, Philadelphia, [Pa.], to Dr. James Agnew, Greenville, MS Territory. 1813 Apr. 6. Glaser sympathized with the hardships caused by the was and offers his assistance for Dr. Agnew's move to the east. Signed: John L. Glaser. 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 31. Letter from Christopher Fry, Norfolk, [Va.], to Thomas W. Smith and Moody Thurlo of Augusta, Kinnebunk, MA. 1813 Apr. 7. This letter is regarding the British capture of the Sloop Alert in the lower Chesapeake Bay. The Sloop Alert had its cargo removed and was then sailed to Bermuda. [Note: The British used the Sloop Alert to carry cargo until sunk by an American patrol in the North Atlantic in late 1813.] Signed: Chris.r. Fry. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 32. Col. John Coffee (Cmdg., Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry), Orderly Book. 1812 Dec. 18-1813 Apr. 9. Contains entries for the MS Territory expedition and defense of the lower country. (Note: Lt. Basil Shaw, ADC to Col. Coffee, maintained the Orderly Book.). 87 pp. 1 item.

Folder 33. Discharge papers of Cpl. Aaron Alexander, [Capt. William Moore's Company, 1st Regiment, Tennessee Volunteer Infantry]. 1813 Apr. 20. Certifies the dates of his service, and that he volunteered and is discharged. Printed, with name and word "discharged" filled in by hand. Signed by Andrew Jackson: A. Jackson Maj Genl. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 34. Reimbursement claim from Lt. Andrew Hynes [ADC to Maj. Genl. Jackson]. 1813 Apr. 22. Reimbursement claim for transporting his private baggage on the expedition to Natchez, MS Territory from 1812 Dec. 10 to 1813 Apr. 22. Attests to the truthfulness of the claim on 1816 Oct. 16 and records that payment was received on 1817 Jan. 9. Signed: And. Hynes Lieut & Aid deCamp. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 35. Provision return for men in the company of the Troop Cavalry of Capt. Charles Kavanaugh, Tennessee Mounted Cavalry. 1813 June 19. Provision return for fifty-two men during 1813 Apr. 22-23. Endorsed by Col. John Coffee, Cmdg. Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry. Signed: C. Kavanaugh. Capt.; endorsed: Jno. [John] Coffee, Col., Regt. Tense. V. Cavary [sic], United States Service. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 36. Note from [Brig.] Gen. [Ferdinand L.] Claiborne, [Cmdg., Mississippi Territory Militia and Volunteers], Soldiers Retreat to The Governor [of Mississippi Territory], His Excellency David Holmes, Washington, [DC]. 1813 July 20. Acknowledges the Governor's desire to meet early the next day. 3 pp. 1 item.


PHASE III --- The Creek War


Tecumseh, chief of the Shawnees residing the northwest, endeavored in the summer of 1811 to convince the southern tribes to join the Shawnees in a consolidated force on the frontier. Tecumseh promised that other northwest tribes and the British would support this Indian confederacy. Rebuffed by the Chickasaws and Choctaws, he visited the Creeks, the south's largest Indian nation. Tecumseh's overture divided the Creeks, and a civil war commenced that soon included attacks on white settlers by pro-war Creeks known as the "Redsticks." The materials in this series include military documents from troops under General Jackson, as well as from the Georgia and Mississippi Territory militias. The Cherokee involvement is also represented. Two especially significant documents are the first known battle report of the Creek War (3 November, 1814), and the letter to Governor Blount that accompanied the peace treaty with the Creeks (9 August, 1814).

Folder 37. Letter from John Ross, [Cherokee Indian Chief], Chickamoga, to Col. Return J. Meigs, [U.S.] Agent for Cherokees, High[m or w]assee Garrison. 1813 July 30. Concerns civil war between the Upper and Lower Creek Indians and the need to support Big Warrior of the Lower Creeks. Signed: Jno. Ross. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 38. Letter from Governor [Ninian] Edwards [of Illinois Territory] to His Excellency Gov. [Isaac] Shelby, Frankfort, Kentucky. 1813 Aug. 8. States the "War with the Creeks is inevitable", based on reports from Governor Holmes of the Mississippi Territory. Signed: N. Edwards. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 39. Legal document from the case of Private Jacob McCoy, U.S. Army, Washington County, TN, vs. Private Arnold Green, Tennessee Mounted Volunteers. 1813 Aug. [15]. Drawn up by attorneys for plaintiff, Lowry & Powell. McCoy's complaint was that he gave Green $55 to bring to his wife Susannah McCoy, and that Green neither gave Mrs. McCoy the money nor returned it to Private McCoy. McCoy asks that Green be made to pay that money and damages. [Green was in Capt. Sam Bunch's company.]. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 40. Order of Genl. [Andrew] Jackson for the Repairs of Muskets. 1813 Sept. 25. General order addressed to the assistant deputy quartermaster [William B. Lewis] that he employ John [?] and others to repair muskets now in the hands of [illegible]. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Written in Nashville. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 41. Order of Genl. [Andrew] Jackson for axes and Pack horses for Cavalry, Nashville. 1813 Sept. 27. General order from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, Headquarters, Nashville, to the Assistant deputy quartermaster [William B. Lewis], to furnish packhorses and axes to the Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry and Volunteer Mounted Gunmen. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 42. Order [of] Genl. [Andrew] Jackson for 10 stands of arms to Capt. Williamson. 1813 Sept. 29. Addressed to Major Wm. B. Lewis, Asst. D.Q. Master, Nashville. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. [The arms were for Capt. Thomas Williamson, 2nd Regiment Tennessee Volunteer Infantry]. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 43. Letter from [Maj. Genl.] Andrew Jackson to Major John Reid, [Tennessee Militia HQ Division and ADC to Jackson]. 1813 Oct. 2. Concerns the preparations and assembly of troops in Fayetteville, TN prior to the march against the Creek Indians. Signed: Andrew Jackson. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 44. Order from Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson, Camp Blount, to Lieutenant [James] Bradley, [1st Regiment, Tennessee Volunteer Infantry], and Quartermaster [Lt. Richard] Alexander, [1st Regiment, Tennessee Volunteer Infantry. 1813 Oct. 10. They are ordered to value the wagons and teams taken into service of the U.S. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 45. Letter from Brig. Genl. John Coffee, [Cmdg. Tennessee Mounted Gunmen], Tallushatche Town, to Major Genl. [Andrew] Jackson. 1813 Nov. 3. Battlefield report of the engagement with the Creek Indians at Tallushatche Town reporting the destruction of the enemy. Jackson's endorsement requests Maj. John Bradley, Fort Deposit, forward the communication to Maj. John Reid. Signed: Jno. Coffee Genl. Brigdr. Endorsed: Major Genl. Jackson. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 46. Settlement of claim by Cherokee Indian Big Cabin. 1813 Nov. 9. Col. John Brown, [East Tennessee Mounted Gunmen], and [Regimental Quartermaster] Abner Underwood settle Big Cabin's claim for one hog delivered by Secakee on behalf of the [U.S.] government. Signed: Abner Underwood, R.Q.M., John Brown, C.C. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 47. Fragment of provision return with signature of Brig. Genl. William Hall, Cmdg., 1st Brigade of Tennessee Volunteers. [1813]. Signed: W. Hall, Brig. Genl. Attached to a much later document with a brief biography of Gen. Hall. (Handwritten). 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 48. Order of Genl. [Andrew] Jackson for Public Blankets, Fort Strother. 1813 Nov. 12. Order addressed to "Adjutant deputy Quartermaster (William B. Lewis)" concerning forwarding blankets to Fort Strother to benefit the army against the hostile Creek Indians. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Maj. Genl. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 49. Authorization of payment to Thomas Dale by Lt. Col. Peter Perkins, in charge of Sick & [Wounded], Huntsville, [Mississippi Territory]. 1813 Dec. 11. Lt. Col. Peter Perkins authorizes payment of six dollars to Thomas Dale for conveying the sick and wounded of Genl. Jackson. Endorsed by Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson and (on verso) by Capt. Abel Willis, 2nd Regiment Tennessee Militia. Signed: L. Perkins L. Col., in Charge of Sick & W.; endorsements: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl.; and Abel Willis Capt, 2nd Regt. T. Militia. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 50. General order from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, Headquarters, to Col. [John K.] Wynne, [1st Regiment, West Tennessee Militia], and Col. [William] Lillard, [Cmdg., 1st Division, East Tennessee Militia. 1813 Dec. 26. Orders a march of seventy men with suitable number of officers, along with [Capt. John] Gordon's and [Capt. William] Russell's spies to reconnoiter the Cohauba. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 51. Letter from [Maj. Samuel] Champlain, [DQMG, Sixth Military District], Charleston, So. Carolina, to Colonel Francis K. Huger, Adjutant General 6th & 7th [Military] Districts, Fort Hawkins, Georgia. 1814 Jan. 6. Concerns supplies to North and South Carolina Militia called into service to support B. Genl. John Floyd and the Georgia Militia's initiative against the Creek Indians. Signed: Champlain. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 52. Request from B. Genl. Thos. [Thomas] Washington, 9th Brigade of Tennessee Militia, for payment to Pvt. Martin McFerrin, West Tennessee Mounted Infantry. 1814 Jan. 12. Requests the Adjutant Deputy Quarter Master General, [William B. Lewis], to pay Pvt. Martin for carrying orders in compliance with Governor [Willie] Blount's requisition of troops. Signed: Thos Washington, B. Genl. 9th Brigade, Tenn. Militia. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 53. Claim for payment for services by [Dr.] Thomas Fern, Acting Hosp[ital] Surgeon at Fort Strother by Order of Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson. 1814 Jan. 14. Payment for services from 1813 Dec. 11 to 1814 Jan. 14. Claim was paid 1817 Mar. 2 upon certification by Cornet David Moore, Judge Advocate Tennessee Mounted Volunteer Gunmen, and endorsement by Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson. Signatures and endorsements: Thos. Fearn, Acting Hosp Surgn. Ft. Strother (signed in two places); David Moore, J.A.; Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Cmdg. D. of the South. Part of the document is printed; most is handwritten additions. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 54. General orders from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, Head Quarters, Camp Wehouge. 1814 Jan. 17. Concerns order of march for the Tennessee militia troops from Wehouge [near Ft. Strother] to the Indian villages. [In the hand of Lt. Robert Searcy, ADC to Jackson, but signed by Jackson]. Signed: Andw. Jackson, Maj. Genl. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 55. Letter from James Monroe, [Secretary of State], Department of State, to Collector of Customs, Savannah, [Ga.]. 1814 Jan. 21. Provides instructions regarding commissions for equipping and arming private vessels (privateers), specifying requirements for the number of officers and crew, amount of armaments, and type of ship, and ordering that commissions already issued to ships that do not meet these standards be revoked, and that applications by vessels "of this inferior class" be sent to the State Department for review. Printed letter with title of recipient filled in by hand. Signed: Jas. Monroe. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 56. Receipt to Pvt. William Kindel, [Tennessee Militia Infantry], from [Archibald] Potter, [Deputy Quarter Master General of Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson's Division of the Tennessee Militia.]. 1814 Jan. 31. The receipt is for muskets and accoutrements for the use of Genl. Jackson, is endorsed for payment by Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson on 1814 May 25, and receipted by Kindel on the same date. Signatures and endorsements: Recto: A. Potter D. Q. Master Genl.; Verso: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl.; William Kindel. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 57. Orders of Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson to Brigadier Genl. Isaac Roberts, [West Tennessee Militia, consigned to Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson's Division], with additional orders from Roberts to the commanding officers of the 1st and 2nd Regiments of Mounted Infantry. 1814 Jan. 31-Feb. 5. Jackson orders Roberts to thank the men for their service and instructs him to march them home. Signed: Hmb. servt. Andr. Jackson, Maj. Genl. Roberts adds at the bottom of the page his orders to the commanders of the 1st and 2nd Regiments of Mounted Infantry to discharge the men at Fayetteville, Tennessee. Signed: Isaac Roberts B.G. 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 58. Abstract of provisions issued from the 6th of November 1813 to the tenth of March 1814 inclusive to the Troops in the Service of the United States under the command of Major General Andrew Jackson on the South side of the Tennessee River and under the Contract of Ward & Taylor, Kentucky. 1813 Dec. 6-1814 Mar. 10. For provisions for Capt. John Gordon's Company of Spies. Lists dates of returns, number of men, number of days [included in return], and amounts of flour, meat, whisky [sic], soap, and salt. Endorsement to pay for provisions by Andrew Jackson. Signed: Andrew Jackson Major Genl. Cdmg. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 59. Granting of provision return for men under the command of The Path Killer [Cherokee Chief]. 1814 Mar. 24. For 28 men under Path Killer's command from 1814 Mar. 24-Apr. 1. Endorsed for payment by Andrew Jackson. Endorsement: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 60. Provision return for Maj. Robert Rhea [1st Regiment of East Tennessee Militia], his Adj. Gen., and two cooks. 1814 Mar. 27. Return issued at Ft. Williams, for one day, the 28th. Signed: Robt. Rhea Majr., 1st Regt. E. T. M. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 61. Bill from Dr. James Roane for tending [Pvt.] Arnold of Capt. [Edward] Brannon's Company, [East Tennessee Militia]. 1814 May 13. Dr. Roane itemizes the procedures and medications used during his three visits to Pvt. Arnold. Pvt. Arnold was wounded at the battle of Taladega [Mississippi Territory] and subsequently died. Signed: J. Roane. Claim certified 1814 May 13 by James Hogg, Murfreesboro, Tennessee; signed: James Hogg. Claim endorsed by Andrew Jackson; signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 62. Appointment of John Larman as Deputy Assistant Commissary General by the Prince Regent on behalf of George III [King of England]. 1814 July 12. Signed by the Secretary of War and two generals. Two seals are affixed to the document. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 63. Monetary claim from Elijah Hicks, [Member of Cherokee Senate] to the United States. 1814 July 13. Claim for $46 for services in providing boats laden with corn and issuing it to the Cherokees, valued at expenses of $2 a day for 23 days. Signed: Elijah Hicks. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 64. Claim for services by Dr. William Ward for attendance on [Cpl.] George Douglas, [Saddler Tennessee] Volunteer Cavalry. 1814 July 20. Douglas was wounded at the battle at Taladega [Mississippi Territory], as a volunteer under the command of Capt. Robert [Setton?] Ward attended him 1814 Mar. 24-July 20, and asks for $51.25. He has receipted the bill at the bottom of the page; signed: William Ward; noted that this is a duplicate. On verso, Andrew Jackson endorsed the bill for payment; signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Comdg G. of the South; this is also noted as a duplicate, although it is in Jackson's hand. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 65. Letter from [John] Armstrong, [Secretary of War], War Dept., to General [recipient unknown]. 1814 July 28. Armstrong recommends to the recipient Dr. Jennings of Virginia, who is "propagat[ing] his very benevolent invention, the portable warm, or hot, bath." Signed: J. Armstrong. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 66. Letter from Maj. Genl. Cmdg. Andrew Jackson, Fort Jackson, to Major William B. Lewis, [Adjutant Deputy Quarter Master General]. 1814 Aug. 9. Jackson is forwarding to Governor [Willie] Blount [of Tennessee] via Col. [Alsander J.] Acklen express the peace treaty with the Creeks just signed at 2:30PM. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Cmdg. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 67. Printed circular concerning the treaty with the Creek Nation and setting forth the boundary lines between the Creek and Cherokee nations. 1814 Aug. 9. The first paragraph is a transcription of the treaty itself, followed by a paragraph describing the circumstances of the signing, followed by a statement regarding the setting of the boundaries and signing of the treaty by Andrew Jackson, Maj. Gen. Com'ng.; Benjamin Hawkins, Agent of I. A.; and Return J. Meigs, Agent for the Cherokee. Entirely printed. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 68. Deposition of Thomas J. Read [Ens., Tennessee Militia, Davidson County] in case concerning Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson's prisoners from the Creek Nation. 1814 Sept. 24. Read gives his deposition as witness to the conversation between the late Maj. Samuel P. Montgomery of the 39th U.S. Infantry and Edward D. Hobbs, Nashville jailer, whereby a verbal contract was agreed. The contract provided for the care and safety of Indian prisoners sent by Maj. Genl. Jackson from the Creek Nation. Signed: Th. J. Read. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 69. Claim of Edward D. Hobbs [Keeper of the Nashville Public Jail] for taking charge of 33 [Creek] Indian prisoners sent by Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson for safe keeping. 1814 Sept. 27. Claim includes an accounting of how many prisoners were sent, on which days they were sent, and when they left. Signed: Edward D. Hobbs. Sworn before and attested to by John McNairy, District Judge of Tennessee's Superior Court; signed: John McNairy, District Judge. Endorsed by Tobias Lear, Department of War Accounting Office on 1814 Dec. 23 and by James Monroe, Secretary of War on 1815 Feb. 27; signed: Tobias Lear and Jas. Monroe. Edward Hobbs acknowledges receipt of funds on 1815 May 18; signed: Edward D. Hobbs. 2 leaves 1 item.


PHASE IV --- The Gulf Campaign and the Battle of New Orleans


Following the Creek War, British designs on the Gulf Coast grew increasingly evident. Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson received the command of the Seventh Military District responsible for the defense of Louisiana and the Mississippi Territory. This series contains military manuscripts related to Jackson's defense beginning in September 1814, including general orders, letters, monthly and daily returns, civilian and military claims, eyewitness accounts (American and British) of the Battle of New Orleans and another volume of B. Genl. Coffee's order book. Also included is a record of the execution of the six militia men in February 1815 and documentation of Jackson's subsequent fine and return to Tennessee in early April 1815.

Folder 70. Certification by B. Genl. Thomas Washington, Cmdg, 9th Brigade, Tennessee Militia, concerning Pvt. Jesse Cain. 1814 Sept. 3. Certifies that Pvt. Cain was employed to carry his orders to the commanders of the 20th, 21st, 22nd, 44th, and 45th Regiments. Document damaged; one corner missing. Signed: Thos. Washington, B. Genl. 9th Brigade, Tenn. Militia. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 71. Letter from [James] Monroe, Secretary of war, War Department, to Dr. Christopher Backus. 1814 Sept. 6. Appoints Backus as Assistant Apothecary General in the service of the United States with orders to report to the Commanding General of the 7th Military District in New Orleans. Printed letter with names and specific orders filled in by hand; signed: Jas. Monroe. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 72. Letter from Brig. Genl. [John] Coffee, [Cmdg., Tennessee Mounted Gunmen], Murfreesborough, [Tenn.] to Col. Robert H. Dyer. 1814 Sept. 11. Orders Dyer to command the Regiment with Lt. Col.'s James Lauderdale, Lt. Col. John H. Gibson, Maj. Michael Molton, and Maj. Charles Kavenaugh, and to procure volunteers for the defense of their country before repairing to Fayetteville, [Tennessee]. Signed: Jno. Coffee, Brig. Genl. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 73. Orders from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, Fort Strother, to William B. Lewis, [Adjutant Deputy Quarter Master General]. 1814 [Sept.]. Orders the purchase of 100 stand of muskets and accoutrements for the 39th Regiment, U.S. Infantry. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 74. Letter from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, Headquarters, 7th Military District, Mobile, [Ala.], to [Hi]s Excellency Willie Blount, Governor of Tennessee. 1814 Oct. 10. Jackson gives thanks for the support provided his troops, especially the Directors of the Nashville Bank for their confidence and financial assistance. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major. Genl. Comdg. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 75. Morning Report of the Troops stationed at Fort Charlotte commanded by Col. [Richard] Sparks, 12th Oct. 1814. 1814 Oct. 12. Report of Lt. [Newman S.] Clarke, Adj. 2nd [Regiment, U.S.] Infantry and Col. [Richard] Sparks, [Cmdg., 2nd Regiment, U.S. Infantry], for the Field Staff, Capt. William F. Ware's Company, and detachments of the 1st Artillerists and the 44th Regiment, U.S. Infantry. Includes numbers on duty, out sick, learning music, unfit for service, and absent from duty. Signed: N. Clarke Lt., Adj. 2 Infy.; and R. Sparks, Col. [illegible]. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 76. Receipt from [Maj. William] B. Lewis, [Adjutant Quarter Master General, Nashville, Tennessee] for a horse. [1814 Oct.]. Receipt for purchase of a horse to be used by the Express when the 5000 troops [commanded by Maj. Genl. William Carroll] are ordered into service. Signed: W. B. Lewis. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 77. Letter from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, Head quarters 7th M. [Military] District, Mobile, to Col. Andrew Hynes, Adjutant Genl. of the State of Tennessee, Nashville. 1814 Oct. 21. The letter contains instructions as to the urgency in sending troops, and Jackson expresses his pleasure to learn that Col. William Carroll has been appointed Maj. Genl. of the 2nd Regiment of Tennessee Militia. Signed: Andrew Jackson. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 78. Note by Andrew Jackson certifying the promotion of and orders given to Capt. William Lauderdale. 1817 May 23. Certifies that Capt. William Lauderdale was appointed adjutant deputy quarter master general on 1814 Oct. 22, with orders to proceed immediately to Ft. Jackson, Ft. Williams, and Ft. Strother to expedite the forwarding of supplies for the troops. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. cmdg, D. of the South. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 79. Subsistence Account of Ensign Joseph Whisonant of Lt. Col. McMillan's Regiment of South Carolina Militia Infantry in the Service of the United States. 1814 Oct. 31. For the period of 1814 Oct. 4-Oct. 31. Lists no. of days, no. of rations per day, "Post or Place, where due", and price of rations. This is a printed document with names and other information filled in by hand. Certified by Whisonant; signed: Jos. Whisonant Ensign, S.C. M. Infantry. Certified by David Schrock; signed: David Schrock, Regt. Pay-Master, So. Ca. Militia. Receipted by Whisonant; signature same as previous. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 80. Contract between John Shute, John Nichols, John Harding [Davidson Country plantation owners], Giles Harding, and James Camp, and, for the Army, William B. Lewis, Adjutant Deputy Quarter Master [General]. 1814 Nov. 3. Contract for corn to be delivered to Baton Rouge in support of Maj. Genl. William Carroll's troops. Witnessed by [Oliver] B. Hays and John G. [illegible]. This is a duplicate copy of the contract, but with original signatures of those involved. Following the signatures of the sellers is the word "seal". Signatures: John Shute, John Nichols, John Harding, Giles Harding, James Camp, William B. Lewis, Adjt. Depty [sic] Quarter Master, Ol. B. Hayes, and John G. [?]. 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 81. Request of Pvt. Charles Lewis for payment of expenses while serving as Express and other duties. 1814 Nov. 6. Lewis, a member of Col. Pipkin's Regiment of TN Militia Infantry, requests payment for forage and subsistence while serving as Express and other duties from 1814 Sept. 20-1814 Nov. 6. This is a duplicate copy of the request. Signed: Charles Lewis. On verso, endorsed by Col. [Philip] Pipkin, Cmdg., 1st Regiment of TN Militia (signed: P. Pipkin, Col. Comd. 1st R. M. T.) and Andrew Jackson (signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Cmdg, 7th M. District), and receipted by Lewis (signed: Charles Lewis). 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 82. Account of expenses due Dr. Garrow Wilson for supplies for the Choctaw, receipted by Wilson as paid. 1814 Nov. 7. Thomas Butler, [Aide-de-Camp to Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson], lists the items and prices of medical supplies provided by Wilson to the Choctaw Indians in the service of the United States, ordering the Adjutant Deputy Quarter Master General to pay the expenses. Signed: Th. Butler aid de camp. At the bottom of the page, Wilson attests that the expenses were paid. Signed: Garrow Wilson. Also at bottom of page: "Signed duplicates". 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 83. Receipt from William B. Lewis, [Adjutant Deputy Quarter Master General], to [James] Tilford & Co., Nashville, Tennessee. 1814 Nov. 14. For two blankets for the Chickasaw Indian Chiefs George and Jack on their way to visit the President. Signed on receiving payment by William Hart on behalf of James Tilford & Co.: Willm. Hart. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 84. Receipt from Polly Jones for payment for shirts for two Chickasaw Indians. 1814 Nov. 14. Jones acknowledges receipt of payment of $1.121/2 for making two shirts for Chickasaw Indians George and Jack by order of [Tennessee] Gov. [Willie] Blount. [Jones was a survivor of the Ft. Mims massacre.] Signed duplicate. Signature: Polly Jones. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 85. Claim for payment by [Maj. Howell] Tatum, [Topographical] Engineer [assigned to Maj. Genl. Jackson's Division] for transportation of baggage. 1814 Nov. 20. Tatum asks payment for transportation of personal baggage from Mobile to Pensacola and back. At the bottom of the page is his receipt for the payment. Both statements are signed: Ho. Tatum, Maj., Top. Engineer; this side is marked signed duplicate. On verso, Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson endorses the claim for payment. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Cmdg., 7th M. District. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 86. Letter from [Col. Frederick] Stovin, [Assistant Adj. Gen., British Army], H.M.S. Tonnant, to his mother, Mrs. Stovin, Newbold, near Chesterfield. 1814 Dec. 5. Stovin's ship joined [Adm.] Alexander Cochrane's fleet at Jamaica, a place Stovin was pleased with. They are now "laying off Pensacola making our arrangements for the attack of New Orleans." He has great confidence in British success in New Orleans, and describes [Adm.] Sir Alexander [Cochrane] in glowing terms. He asks that she write him lots of letters, very often. [The H.M.S. Tonnant was the flagship of Admiral Alexander Cochrane's fleet.] 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 87. Account by [Lt. Neal] B. Rose, [Brigade Quartermaster, Volunteer Mounted Gunmen], Camp near Sandy Creek, M[ississippi] T[erritory], of money owed Rebecca Clark. 1814 Dec. 11. Attests to claim of Rebecca Clark, owner of farm at Sandy Creek, for corn and fodder in support of [Brig.] Genl. [John] Coffee's troops. Signed: N. B. Rose, Brig. Q. Master; and John Coffee, Brig. Genl. Endorsed for payment by Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson; signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Cmdg, 7th M. District, New Orleans. Payment receipted by Rebecca Clark; signed: Rebecca Clark. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 88. Morning Report of the Third Regiment of Infantry, Commanded by Major [Joseph] Woodruff. 1814 Dec. 29. Report from Camp Lance, Mandeville, [La.], listing who of what rank was on duty, sick, arrested or confined, or absent, by company. Companies are identified by name of captain. Printed form filled in by hand, and signed by [Lt. Archimedes] Donoho, [Regimental Adj., 3rd Regiment of US Infantry], and [Maj. William] Butler, [2nd in Command, 3rd Regiment of US Infantry]. Signatures: A. Donoho, [illegible]; and W. Butler, Maj. [illegible]. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 89. Morning Report of the Third Regiment of Infantry, Commanded by Major [Joseph] Woodruff. 1814 Dec. 31. Report from Camp Lance, Mandeville, [La.], listing who of what rank was on duty, sick, arrested or confined, or absent, by company. Companies are identified by name of captain. Printed form filled in by hand, and signed by [Lt. Archimedes] Donoho, [Regimental Adj., 3rd Regiment of US Infantry], and [Maj. Joseph] Woodruff, [Cmdg., 3rd Regiment of US Infantry]. Signatures: A. Donoho, [illegible]; and J. Woodruff, Maj. cmdg. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 90. Monthly return of a Detachment of Ms.T. [Mississippi Territory] Militia Infantry in the service of the U.S. for the Month of December 1814 Commd. [Commanded] by Major Ross. 1814 Dec. 31. The detachment was stationed at Camp Mandeville, La. Lists numbers on duty, sick, arrested, and absent. Beneath this is "Explanations and Remarks" which explains the locations and orders for both commissioned and non-commissioned officers. Signed: Ely K. Ross, Major. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 91. Consolidated Morning Report of the 3rd Regt. [Regiment] U.S. Infantry and 24th Regt. Infantry. The Mississippi & East [illegible word] West Tennessee Militia; commanded by Lieut Col. [Anbuckle?]. 1815 Jan. 1. The troops were stationed at Camp Mandeville, La. The report lists how many men were on duty, sick, extra duty, arrested or confined, and absent. Signed: [Lt. Thomas S.] Rogers, acting asst. asdt. Genl., [3rd Regiment of US Infantry.]. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 92. Pass from Edw[ard] L. Livingston, [ADC to Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson] for mule driver Preval; with print "Battle of New Orleans, January 8th 1815, Engraved Expressly for Abbotts Lives of the Presidents." 1815 Jan. [1]. The pass gives mule driver Preval, [1st Division Louisiana Militia, 7th Regiment] permission to pass through the lines in going to town [New Orleans] and back. Signed: Edw. Livingston, ADC. The print, by B.B. Russell & Co., Boston, shows an exterior battle scene of the Battle of New Orleans (1815 Jan. 8), showing the American battle line and soldiers firing on advancing British troops. Also shown: United States flag, fires burning, and in background, firing sailing ships on the Mississippi River. At right, Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson is on horseback with hat held high in his right hand. From the book Lives of the Presidents by John S. C. Abbott, published by B.B. Russell & Co., [1867?] Inscriptions on support of print: Drawn by H. Billings; Boston-- B.B. Russell & Co.; Engd. by D. Pelton; Battle of New Orleans./ January 8th 1815/ Engraved Expressly for Abbotts Lives of the Presidents. The composition of the engraving measures 4 1/2 x 7 1/8 in., the support 6 x 9 1/8 in. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 93. Letter from [Maj.] John Reid, [44th Regiment of US Infantry, ADC to Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson], Camp 4 Miles below New Orleans, to Maj. Abram Maury, Franklintown, Tennessee. 1815 Jan. 2. Reid discusses at great length and in great detail the artillery battle with the British on 1815 Jan. 1, and lists those officers of Genl. [John] Coffee's brigade [of the Tennessee militia] who were killed, wounded, or taken prisoner. He will not be writing Betsy, because "a letter to [Maury] is the same as one to her." Signed: John Reid. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 94. General orders of Col. [Bartholomew] Shambaugh, [ADC to Louisiana Governor W.C.C. Claiborne] to "Camp [on] Right Bank of the Mississippi". 1815 Jan. 7. Orders that they are to be held in readiness to march at a moment's warning. Signed: Bw. Shambaugh, Cols. aid de Camp. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 95. Note by [Lt.] Col. [William] Willis, [Cmdg., 20th Regiment of Louisiana Militia], requesting that [Thomas] A. Willis & Co. be paid for 20 pots furnished his regiment. 1815 Jan. 7. Signed: W. Willis Col. Comg. Endorsed for payment by Andrew Jackson (signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Cmdg.), and on verso, Louisiana Governor W. C. C. Claiborne (signed: Wm. C.C. Claiborne, Govr. of Louisiana) and [William] Platt, [Lt. Col. 34th Regiment of US Infantry] (signed: W. Piatt, [illegible]. On bottom of front page, Willis has signed that he received payment (signed: Thomas A. Willis). 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 96. Provision Return for Capt. [John] Bills' Company. 1815 Jan. 7. [Capt. John Bills was Co. Cdr. 10th Regiment Louisiana Militia]. Signed: John Bills, Capt. Endorsed by Maj. Robert Davis in the absence of the Col. Cmdg. Signed: Robert Davis Major 10th, Regiment Command in absence. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 97. Provision Return for the Officers and men of Capt. Ross' Company of the 10th Regt. Louisiana Militia... 1815 Jan. 7. The company was stationed at Camp Jackson, and was signed by Col. Robert Young, Cmdg. 10th Regiment Louisiana Militia. Signature: Robert Young, Col. Cmdg. [illegible]. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 98. Provision Return for the officers and Men of Capt. [Thomas] Nesom's Company of the 10th Regiment Louisiana Militia. 1815 Jan. 7. Capt. Nesom's company was stationed at Camp Jackson. The return is signed by Col. Robert Young, Cmdg., 10th Regiment Louisiana Militia. Signed: Robert Young, Col. Comdt. 10th Rgt. L. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 99. Morning Report of the Third Regiment of Infantry, Commanded by Major [Joseph] Woodruff. 1815 Jan. 7-Jan. 8. Report from Camp Lance, Mandeville, [La.], listing who of what rank was on duty, sick, arrested or confined, or absent, by company. Companies are identified by name of captain. Printed form filled in by hand, and signed by [Lt. Archimedes] Donoho, [Regimental Adj., 3rd Regiment of US Infantry]. Signed: A. Donoho Lieut. [illegible]. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 100. Petition to have William Sterling of Louisiana appointed to fill a vacancy in Capt. Baker's 44th Regiment, US Infantry. 1815 Jan. [8]. Addressed to Major Genl. Andrew Jackson by the officers of the 44th Regiment. They state that they know the young man personally or by representation, and believe he would be a worthy addition to the Regiment, and suggest the rank of Lieutenant. Signing the petition were: Capt. Isaac L. Baker (signed: Isaac L. Baker Capt., Comdg 44th Regt. Infy.); Capt. Joseph J. Miles (signed: J. Miles Capt., 44th inf.); Lt. William Gibbes (signed: W. Gibbes Lt., ad[?] 44 inty.); Lt. James P. Smith (signed: James P. Smith, Lieut, 44th Infy.); Capt. William O. Butler (signed: W. O. Butler, Capt. 44 Infy.); Capt. John M. Barclay (signed: John M. Barclay, Capt., 44); Lt. Richard K. Call (signed: R. K. Call, Lieut. 44th Inf.); Lt. Moses Cox (signed: Moses Cox, Jr. Lt. 44th Inf.); and Lt. John P. Baker (signed: John P. Baker Lt. 44 Infy.). 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 101. Letter from [George Michael] Troup, [Member of Congress], Georgia, to [Benjamin] W. Crowningshield, [Secretary] of the Navy, Washington, [DC]. 1815 Jan. 10. Requests that James McCall be issued a warrant after serving as a surgeon's and sailing mate under Commodore Hugh Campbell, US Navy. Signed: G. M. Troup. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 102. Note from [Edward] Livingston, [ADC to Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson], to B. Genl. David B. Morgan. 1815 Jan. 12. Forwards Genl. Jackson's orders for the Col., Dr. Clouet, to repait to HQ. On the verso, Livingston has written: "Let the bearer pass." Signed: Edw. Livingston, ADC. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 103. Letter from Major John Reid ([44th Regiment of US Infantry], ADC to [Maj.] Genl. Jackson, Camp 4 Miles below Orleans, to Major Abram Maury, near Franklin Town, Tennessee. 1815 Jan. 13. Reid reflects on the battle of the 8th [the Battle of New Orleans], wondering how "incredulous" those who hear of it will be that they won with an inferior force. He notes that the British have withdrawn to their former positions, and speculates as to their next move, whether they will wait for reinforcements, or, as he believes, abandon the expedition. He continues to hear firing coming from the British bombardment of Ft. St. Philip, and is awaiting intelligence from there; he believes several British vessels have been blown up, but that they still "present a formidable force". He confirms that the British commander, Gen. Packingham was killed on the 8th, and other senior officers badly wounded, leaving Genl. Lambert, a junior officer, as the one Genl. Jackson must deal with. [British] Admiral Cochrane seems willing to agree to "fair terms as to the exchange of prisoners". Signed: John Reid; added in a different ink: Adjutant Gen. to Gen. Jackson. 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 104. Letter from [Cornet Noel Auguste Baron, Jr., Capt. Chaveau's Company of Cavalry, Louisiana Militia], New Orleans, to A. D. Tureaud, Esq., Judge of the Parish of St. James, County of Acadia. 1815 Jan. 13. In French. Friendly to letter to apparently close friend, from an eye-witness to the Battle of New Orleans on 1815 Jan. 7 and 8. Concerns preparations for the Battle of New Orleans and the aftermath, including those made in his personal life, such as his wife's plans should the battle get too close. He also discusses at some length the failure of [B.] Genl. [David] Morgan's efforts to counter the attack on the Right Bank, gives an itemized tally of British losses, and has unfavorable comments about the poor planning of Generals Morgan and Hopkins. Signed: [illegible]. [Note concerning address: there was at no time a government body known as the County of Acadia; Baron apparently simply means to indicate that Tureaud is living among Acadians.] 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 105. Letter from [Maj.] Henry Chotard, ([ADC to Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson] and Assistant Adjutant General, Adj. General's Office, Camp near New Orleans, to [Brig.] Genl. David B. Morgan. 1815 Jan. 14. Directs Morgan, in accordance with Maj. Genl. Jackson's order, to release a detachment from Capt. Johnson's Company in Col. Young's 10th Regiment of Louisiana Militia and have them report to HQ. He also sends two men who belong to a company stationed on Morgan's side of the river, to be sent to their camp. Signed: H. Chotard, As. Adj. Genl. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 106. General orders of Col. Robert Butler, [24th Regiment of US Infantry], Adjutant General, H. Q. 7 [Military] District, Adjutant General's office, Jackson Lines, to Brig. General [David B.] Morgan, Camp [illegible], Mississippi. 1815 Jan. 14. Orders Morgan to account for the killed and wounded on 1814 Dec. 23, 1814 Dec. 28, 1815 Jan. 1, and 1815 Jan. 8. Signed: Robert Butler, Adj. General. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 107. Letter (general orders) from [Maj. Henry] Chotard, [ADC to Maj. Genl. Jackson] and Assistant Adjutant General, Adjutant General's Office, Camp, New Orleans, to [Brig.] General [David B.] Morgan. 1815 Jan. 17. Conveys the very detailed orders of Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson for Brig. Genl. Morgan to march 600 men down river, cross behind the retreating British troops, and make preparations to attack them. Signed: H. Chotard, As. Adj. Genl. 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 108. Letter from [Alexander V.] LaNeuville, [Adj. and Inspector General, Governor Claiborne's Staff], Head Quarters, to Bridigier General [David B.] Morgan, Commanding the Drafted Militia. 1815 Jan. 17. Regards a conflict with Governor Claiborne as to the proper chain of command until Morgan is removed to Ft. St. Leon. Signed: A. LaNeuville, Adjt. Genl. 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 109. Letter from Duke W. Sumner [(Plantation owner)], Attakapaz, to Joseph Philips Esqr., Nashville, Tennessee. 1815 Jan. 19. Sumner writes about the difficulties caused by the war: his need to delay his return to Nashville, his problems keeping good workmen who do not get conscripted for duty, his fear that they are unprotected -- that "the British can very easily come into our country and do as they have done in other parts of America" unless Gen. Jackson is entirely successful in New Orleans. He sends regards to Philips' family, and in a postscript to Father Dickinson; in a second postscript he asks for news of Mr. Martin. Signed: Duke W. Sumner; first postscript signed: D. W. Sumner. 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 110. Letter from [Col. Frederick] Stovin, [Deputy Adj. Genl., British Army], HMS Tonnant, to Mrs. Stovin (his mother), Newbold, near Chesterfield, [England]. 1815 Jan. 24. Stovin writes regarding the wound to the neck he received on Jan. 8, from which he hopes to be recovered in a fortnight; his sorrow of the loss of his good friend and patron Gen. [Edward] Pakenham; his belief that the British battle plan was "badly conceived" as they encountered difficulties they did not expect; his feelings about the battle, including his "repugnance" at fighting against those who spoke the same language, and may even have been born British; the lack of letters from home and how much he thinks of her. Signed: F. Stovin. 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 111. Note from [Catherine Sarah Dorothea], Duchess of Wellington, to unknown recipient. 1815 Jan. [30]. The Duchess thanks the recipient for the news that her brother, [Genl. Edward Pakenham], had arrived safely in [New Orleans]. Signed: [Dh.?] Wellington. [Note: Pakenham in fact died in the Battle of New Orleans Jan. 8.]. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 112. Monthly Return of the first battalion of the 24th Regiment of Infantry commanded by Major F. [Francis] W. Armstrong for January 1815. 1815 Jan. 31. Stationed at Camp Mandeville, La. Lists numbers of company on duty, broken down by rank, sick, in arrest or confinement, on extra duty, or absent. Those absent are listed by name with "Where and Why Absent." Signed by Lt. A. [Abraham] Brittain, [Adj., 24th Regiment of US Infantry.] Printed form filled in by hand. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 113. Letter from [Francis] W. Waldo, Boston ([prominent Boston merchant]), Boston, [Mass.], to [Thomas A. Perkins?]. 1815 Feb. 4. Waldo explains that after a thorough search, they were unable to find Worrell's paper. He describes how the money from Parsons was distributed. There was a reports that their [European] commissions were embarked for America, but he does not believe it because he thinks they would have sent dispatches by now. He worries that peace with Great Britain would not last if they had control of the Mississippi and "the consequent dominion over the Western states". He fears they already control New Orleans, and also discusses the Baltimore campaign. He apologizes for "filling up a letter in this manner" but "the New Orleans business" is all anyone can think of. Signed: Frac. W. Waldo. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 114. Note from Brig. Genl. David B. Morgan, Cmdg., [Brigade of Louisiana and Mississippi Drafted Militia], to unknown recipient, Camp chosen Right Bank of the [Mississippi]. 1815 Feb. 8. They have been notified that the house used as a hospital by Col. Young's regiment is too full to receive more patients, the recipient is authorized to take over any vacant house for use as another hospital. Signed: David B. Morgon, Brig. Genl. Comdg. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 115. Letter from D. B. Lyles, Baltimore, Md., to Mr. James Cox, [in] the care of Mr. James R. Riddle, Alexandria. 1815 Feb. 13. Lyles describes the joy everyone is showing having received the news of Gen. Andrew Jackson's victory [over the British in New Orleans], as well as the celebrations planned by the town to mark the event. He believes Richard may join the Navy. With respect to the account Riddle asked him to get settled, he is having difficulties but will do his best. He also mentions how high rents are getting. Signed: D. B. Lyles, with postscript initialed. 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 116. Note documenting payment to George Farragut as a spy for the United States. 1815 Feb. 15. Farragut acted as a spy on the coast from 1814 Dec. 15-1815 Feb. 15. Payment was authorized by Brig. Genl. James Winchester. Signed: J. Winchester, B.G., US Army; rest of note not in Winchester's hand. [Note: Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson ordered Brig. Genl. Winchester to take charge of all troops at Mobile, Mississippi Territory upon his release from captivity by the British.]. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 117. Minutes of Court of Inquiry to determine seniority of rank between Maj. James C. Mitchell and Maj. John Clark of Brig. Genl. Nathan Taylor's Brigage of East Tennessee Militia. 1815 Feb. 18. Court held at Camp Mandeville. Lists those present, who agreed to adjourn to the next day. The next day's minutes list those present, followed by copies of letters supporting the two officer's cases by Col W. [William] Johnson, Cmdg., [3rd Regiment of East Tennessee Militia] (for Mitchell) and by Brig. Genl. Taylor (in favor of Clark), after which court adjourned until the next day. The next day lists those present, who decided in favor of Maj. Mitchell. Signed: E. J. Collins, Recording; W. A. Smartt [William A. Smartt], Major & President. Endorsement: W. [William] L. Robeson, Aid de Camp to Gen. Winchester. 4 pp. 1 item.

Folder 118. Report of main guard mounted at Mobile Fbry. 21st 1815. 1815 Feb. 21. Lists supplies on hand, names and other information of prisoners, including the fact that six were sentenced to death. Recorded by Lt. Robert Gray, Officer of the Day, [3rd Regiment of East Tennessee Drafted Militia]. At the bottom of the first page, he has added a postscript noting "6 Notch[es] and w[ith] good orders fm [from] [New] Orleans". Signed: Robt. Gray Lt., Officer of the Day. [Note: the executions of six men were later used against Andrew Jackson in a smear campaign during the 1828 Presidential election; see Coffin Broadsides in this collection]. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 119. Order by command of [Maj. Thomas] Butler, Aid de Camp [to Maj. Genl. Jackson] to pay [Pvt.] Isaac Shelby, [Tennessee Volunteer Mounted Gunmen], with Shelby's receipt. 1815 Feb. 22. Butler commands that Shelby be paid for "going as Express with dispatches to General Carroll in Bayou [Foanika?], giving his route, and returning to New Orleans by order of General John Coffee. Signed: Th. Butler aid de camp. Receipted at bottom of page by Shelby; signed: Isaac Shelby. Endorsed on verso by Brig. Gen. John Coffee; signed: Jno. Coffee, Brig. Genl. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 120. Letter from [Pvt. William B.] Fort, [Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry], New Orleans, to his father, Major Abraham Fort, Poughkeepsie, State of New-York. 1815 Feb. 24. [Pvt.] Fort gives a first hand account of the battle outside New Orleans 1814 Dec. 23 ("the smoke became so think that we at last friend & foe got jumbled together") and the Battle of New Orleans 1814 Jan. 8, and reflects on subsequent events, including the peace treaty (they have had news of it from the British, but Gen. Jackson awaits it from their own government so that they are not deceived), and the wait for news that the British have left Pensacola. Signed: W. Fort. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 121. Draft of letter from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, Head Quarters, 7th M[ilitary] District [near New Orleans] to Maj. Genl. [John] Lambert, [Cmdg, British Army, near New Orleans]. 1815 Feb. 26. Draft of Jackson's letter regarding exchange of prisoners. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Maj. Genl. Comdg. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 122. Deposition of [Sgt.] Samuel Watkins, [Tennessee Militia Infantry], in a dispute between Giles Harding and Col. William Piatt, Quarter Master General. 1815 Feb. 28. Watkins attests to Giles Harding's measurement of the amount of corn delivered to Baton Rouge, which had been disputed by Col. William Piatt. Signed: Samuel Watkins. Also signed by the Justice of the Peace of Davidson County (signature illegible). [NOTE: See folder 80 for original contract concerning the corn.] 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 123. Payment to Rose, a free Girl of Colour, for living one month as washerwoman in the Hospital for Genl. Coffees' Brigade. 1815 Mar. 3. Robert L. Cobbs, [Surgeon, 2nd Regiment of Tennessee Militia], certifies that Rose is entitled to be paid $10 for the month, and the claim is attested to by David C. Ker, Hospital Surgeon [Mate], US Army. Signatures: Robert L. Cobbs, SSCB; and David C. Ker, Hosp. Surg. USA. Endorsed by Maj. General Andrew Jackson; signature: Andrew Jackson, Major Gen. Comdg. Receipted by Rose, who made her mark, which was witnessed by John M. Walker; signed: John M. Walker. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 124. Subsistence Account of Lieut. John Thackleford of the Battalion of So. Car. [South Carolina] Militia Artillery in U.S. Service. 1815 Mar. 8. Provision return for the period of 1815 Feb. 3-Mar. 8. Endorsed by David Schrock. This is a printed form filled in by Thackleford. The accounts of provisions and costs are on one side. On the verso, Thackleford attests that the returns are accurate, and he has not been paid for them; signed: Jno. Thackleford 2nd Leut. [sic], JCM Arty. in US Service. Underneath this, Schrock endorses the amount as correct; signed: David Schrock, Regt. Paymaster, So. Car. Militia. Below that, Thackleford signs a reciept for the amount requested; signed: Jno. Thackleford, 2nd Lieut. SCM Arty. in U.S. Service. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 125. Letter from Thomas Harper [Pvt. Thomas Harper, East Tennessee Militia?], New Orleans, La., to Madame Josphine De Witt, With the Compliments of General Jackson. 1815 Mar. 14. Jackson presents De Witt with the "chairs and other objects [she] admired in the two rooms", at her convienence, as "a very small token of appreciation for [her] so very valuable assistance to him". Signed: Thomas Harper. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 126. Orderly Book of Brig. Genl. John Coffee, [Cmdg., Tennessee Volunteer Mounted Gunmen. 1814 Sept. 10-1815 Mar. 15. Entries cover the Gulf Campaign and the Battle of New Orleans. [Note: As distinguished from the earlier Orderly Book (folder 32), a substantial number of entries are in the hand of Brig. Genl. Coffee. The Orderly Book was maintained by Lt. Alexander McCullock (Coffee's Aid de Camp), who also made a number of entries. 118 pp. 1 item.

Folder 127. Request for reimbursement from Dr. William Flood, [Plantation owner and Volunteer Doctor]. 1815 Mar. 27. Flood requests reimbursement for the destruction of his sawmill during the January 8 engagement on the Right Bank [now called the Westbank] between the American and British forces. His reported losses included 100,000 feet of cypress plank and 6000 cypress buckets. Signed: William Flood; and David B. Morgan, Brig. Genl. Comdg., Drafted Militia, Louisiana. Endorsed for payment by Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson; signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Comdg. Docketed on verso by Flood, indicating that the funds were received from Col. Simeon Knight, U.S. Army District Paymaster. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 128. Note from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson to Commodore [Daniel T.] Patterson, [U.S. Navy]. 1815 Apr. 2. Jackson requests a statement in support of his declaration of martial law and justification in authorizing the impressment of seamen and laying an embargo. Signed: Andrew Jackson. 2 pp. 1 item.


PHASE V --- The Aftermath of the War of 1812 in the South


This series--as well as the two that follow--spans the years from April 1815 to July 1859, and consists of diverse materials related to the events of the War of 1812. There are several reimbursement documents for services and supplies immediately following the war, and later manuscripts from distinguished participants, including Sam Houston, W. O. Butler, Alexander J. Dallas, Lord Palmerston, James Monroe, William H. Crawford, William Cocke, James K. Polk, Edward Livingston, and others. Also included are decorative snuffboxes commemorating the Battle of New Orleans and the Treaty of Ghent, engravings of the battle, maps of the south from 1812 to 1817, and prints of a later date that pertain to Andrew Jackson.

Folder 129. Request by Maj. Charles Kavanaugh, [Tennessee Volunteer Mounted Gunmen], Washington, [Mississippi Territory], for payment to John Blevins, [Mississippi Territory]. 1815 Apr. 23. Blevins was to be paid for use of a mare by the Kentucky Regiment. Signed: C. Kavanaugh Major, T. V. M. Gunmen. Beneath this, Andrew Jackson has endorsed it for payment; signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Comdg., 7th M. District. On verso, Blevins has signed a receipt; signed: John Blevins. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 130. Discharge paper of Pvt. John O. Davidson of Brig. Genl. John Coffee's brigade of Tennessee Volunteer Mounted Gun-men. 1815 Apr. 27. Printed form filled out by hand. Signed by John Coffee and Capt. [Ephraim D.] Dickson; signatures: Jno. Coffee [printed beneath this is "Brigadier General.] and (at the bottom of the page beneath the printed section) Cap. E. Dickson. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 131. Request by Maj. Charles Kavanaugh, [Tennessee Volunteeer Mounted] Gunmen, Washington, Mississippi Territory, to Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, Nashville, to pay rent to Dr. Cowles Mead for a house used as a hospital. 1815 May 1. Kavanaugh requests reimbursement to Mead for "one house, used as a hospital for the Tennessee detachment" and for damages to the house by fire. Signed: C. Kavanagh Major, T.V.M. Gunmen. On verso, payment has been endorsed by Jackson (signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Comdg., D. of the South) and receipted by Meade (signed: Cowles Mead). 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 132. Letter from [Col.] Robert Butler, [Adj. Gen. and ADC to Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson], Chickasaw Agency, to Col. Robert Hays. 1815 May 4. Butler asks that Hays write by return mail whether Dr. [William] Butler's wife was staying with Hays. Signed: Robert Butler. [Note: Dr. William Butler served in the Natchez expedition and was the escort of Rachael Jackson on her 1815 Feb. trip to New Orleans.] 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 133. Honorable discharge papers of drummer Philip Williams of Maj. Gen. [William] Carroll's 2nd Division of the Tennessee Militia. 1815 May 13. Printed form filled in by hand. Signed: Wm. Carroll (underneath which is printed Major-General 2d Division Tennessee Militia). 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 134. Request from Dan[iel] Rawlings for payment for a horse furnished Maj. Charles Kavanaugh, [Tennessee Volunteer Mounted Gunmen]. 1815 June 11. The horse was furnished for the use of the detachment under Kavanaugh's command. Signed: Dan. Rawlings. Beneath this, Kavanaugh endorses it for payment; signed: C. Kavanaugh Major, T. V. M. Gunmen. On verso, Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson commands the quartermaster to pay the sum, and make duplicates of the paperwork; signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Comdg., D. of the T. Above this, Rawlings acknowledges payment; signed: D. Rawlings. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 135. Note from John Quincy Adams, [US Minister to Great Britain], [London, England], to George Joy, with print of Adams, signed by him. 1815 June 16. Dinner acceptance to George Joy. [Joy was an outspoken advocate of America's cause during the War of 1812. Adams had just arrived in London after successfully negotiating the Treaty of Ghent.] The print is engraved by J. W. Paradise from a painting by A. B. Durand. Adams is shown in a waist-length portrait as a seated balding middle-aged man wearing a high collar, tie, vest, and heavy jacket with large lapels and a double row of buttons. He sits in 3/4 profile facing right against a dark background. Adams name is printed below the portrait. Below this, it is autographed [facsimile?]: J. Q. Adams. The composition measures 4 3/8 x 3 5/8 in; the support measures 9 1/4 x 5 7/8 in. 3 pp. 2 items.

Folder 136. Genl. [Andrew] Jackson's Order relative detachment Sick [Tnns.?] Kentys [Kentucky]. 1815 June 17. Order for Adjutant Deputy Quarter Master General William B. Lewis to provide Capt. [George] Smith, [Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry], the necessary transportation and supplies to take the sick Kentucky troops to their rendezvous and also to support Dr. James Long who will accompany the troops. Signed: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Comdg., D. of the South. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 137. "Free" franked cover from [Maj. William] O. Butler, Aid de camp [to Maj. Genl. Jackson], Nashville, Tennessee, addressed to The Honorable William H. Crawford, Secretary of War, Washington City, [DC]. 1815 June 30. Butler's franking: "Public Service W. O. Butler , Aid de camp . Additional note from later date identifying the item. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 138. Provision Return for one man of the [39th Regiment US Infantry]. 1815 July 13. For the period of 1815 July 3-Sept. 10. Signed: Sam Houston, Lieut. 1st Regt. Infy. [Note: Lt. Houston was stationed in New Orleans after recovering from the sever wound he received at Horseshoe Bend.] On verso, John A. Covington, [39th Regiment, US Infantry], assigns the return to William Boan; signature: Jno. A. Covington. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 139. Note from Tobias Lear, Department of War Accounting Office, to Sir. 1815 July 24. Notifies recipient that the accounts of Lt. Peter Terinan are closed. Terinan was a Squadron Quarter Master of [Col. Hinds'] Mississippi Territory Militia Cavalry. Signed: Tobias Lear. Endorsed by Robert Brent, Paymaster of the Army; signature: R. Brent, [illegible], Pay M. [of Army?]. Note in different hand that "copy sent to clerk with an order to make paymt. July 25 1815." Later note in pencil gives biographical information about Lear. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 140. Letter from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, Nashville, [Tennessee], to the Honorable A. J. [Alexander James] Dallas, Acting Secretary of War. 1815 July 25. Jackson indicates the monetary value of the amounts of goods in the annual distribution to four Southern Indian nations: those Creeks who remain friendly, the Choctaws, the Cherokees, and the Chickasaws. He states that the balance should be distributed to those Chiefs "as most distinguished themselves in our service". He expects the distribution to be speedily carried out by the Indian agents. He has directed Capt. Hutchings that "should no authorized person attend on the part of the Creeks to cause their portion to be forwarded to Ft. Jackson & there properly distributed." Letter in the hand of Maj. John Reid, but signed by Jackson: Andrew Jackson, Major Genl. Comdg., D. of the South. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 141. Circular letter from A. J. [Alexander James] Dallas, Secretary of the Treasury, to [all Port Collectors]. 1815 July 31. Gives instructions for issuing sea letters in case a maritime war in Europe breaks out. Printed letter; signed: A. J. Dallas. [Note: The Treaty of Versailles had just been signed and there was great concern as to whether the peace would last.] 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 142. Letter from Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, Nashville, [Tennessee], to [the] Hon[orable] Sec[retary] of War. 1815 Aug. 1. Advises him that a general order had been issued to his commanders to take possession of public property [army surplus from the War of 1812]. [In the hand of Maj. John Reid]; signed (by Jackson): Andrew Jackson, MajorGenl. Comdg., D. of the South. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 143. Letter from [Lord] Palmerston, [Viscount (Henry John Temple), Minister of War], War Office, [Great Britain], to A. Bruce, Esq[ui]re. 1815 Oct. 25. Palmerston discusses the reimbursement due Pvt. James Stewart, 92nd Regiment . While the 92nd Foot (later the Gordon Highlanders) played no part in the American War, the regiment did serve under the Duke of Wellington in Spain and at Waterloo. 2 pp. 1 item

Folder 144. Letter from Jas. [James] Monroe, [Secretary of State], Department of State, to David B. Mitchell, Esq., [Governor of Georgia]. 1815 Dec. 6. Monroe asks that Mitchell adjudicate the claim of Capt. Abraham A. Massias, late of the Rifle Corps, US Army, for "services of a civil nature, rendered during the short period the forces of the United States occupied West Florida" [late 1812 and 1813]. Because the State Dept. is unfamiliar with the particulars of the case, and because Massias says he received his orders from Mitchell and the late Genl. Matthews, they leave it to Mitchell to decide what sum would be just. "The mode most agreeable to [Mitchell] is that which is preferred by the President." Signed: Jas. Monroe. In a postscript, he notes that they have already advanced Massias $1000 since it is presumed that it would be within the amount ultimately allowed him. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 145. Letter from [William] H. Crawford, [Secretary of War], War Department, to Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, Commanding the Southern division. 1816 Aug. 6. The letter concerns the discharge of soldier of the 7th Regiment [of the US Infantry] who enlisted only for the term of the war, not for five years. Signed: Wm. H. Crawford. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 146. Letter from [Maj. Genl.] Andrew Jackson, Nashville, [Tennessee], to Major Genl. [Philemon] Thomas, [Cmdg., 2nd Division of Louisiana Militia] Baton Rouge, [Louisiana]. 1816 Nov. 20. The letter was to be given to Thomas by Maj. Genl. [Eleazar W.] Ripley, who by command of the War Department, would be taking command of the 8th Military department. Jackson introduces him as "a man of intelligence and military merit". Signed: Andrew Jackson. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 147. Letter from [William] Cocke, [US Agent to the Chickasaw Nation], Chickasaw Agency house, to Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson, near Nashville, Tennessee. 1817 Jan. 15. Cocke sends the letter by way of his son Thomas. He asks for "a just compensation" for the provisions he supplied Gen. Jackson's troops on their return march from New Orleans, including the sick he cared for at the request of Generals Coffee, Carroll and Thomas. He believed Major Kavanaugh would compensate him, but when Kavanaugh came to the agency, Kavanaugh was unable to do so. He also asks for compensation for the services rendered when serving under Jackson's special orders from 1814 Jan. 28-1814 Apr. 20, at which time he found his own horse, which he eventually lost, and bore his own expenses. He asks that Jackson inform his son how he is to acquire "a just return", and writes that he has also written Generals Coffee and Carroll on this subject. Signed: Wm. Cocke. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 148. Letter from [Maj. Genl.] Andrew Jackson, to Col. [Abram] Maury. 1819 Sept. 12. Jackson recommends Col. [Francis W.] Brady as second clerk in the State Senate, and requests Maury's support and that of his friends. Signed: Andrew Jackson. [Note: Col. Brady served with Genl. Jackson in the War of 1812.] 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 149. Letter from [Auguste] Daverzac, [former Aid de Camp to Genl. Jackson and Adjutant General, 7th Military District], New Orleans, [Louisiana], to Lieutenant [Andrew] Ross of the Marine Corps [and formerly Lt., 7th Regiment of US Infantry]. 1822 Feb. 6. Daverzac, as requested by Ross, recalls Ross' actions in leading his regiment on 1815 Jan. 8, the Battle of New Orleans. Ross was commanding troops who were defending the parapet on the right flank of the main battle line. Having had a full view of the battle, he recalls Ross' bravery and good leadership, and says that he examined the witness' testimony for the tribunal held after, and agrees with them that Ross' conduct was above reproach. He believes Ross should have "received some manifestation" of his service that day from the US government, and appreciates the opportunity to attest to Ross' "noble actions". Signed: A. Daverzac, [illegible military title]. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 150. Note from Sen. [Andrew] Jackson to Honbl. [Honorable] John [Quincy] Adams, [Secretary] of State. 1824 Mar. 14. Jackson invites Adams to dinner [in honor of Jackson's 58th birthday party.] [Note: A War of 1812 medal was to be presented to Jackson, but was delayed at his request.] [Note possibly in hand of R. K. Call; unsigned.] 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 151. Letter from [Sen.] Andrew Jackson, Washington City, [DC], to George A. Botts, Esq., Flemingsburgh [now Flemingsburg], Ky. 1825 Feb. 5. In reply to Botts' letter about the Widow Friel, Jackson informs Botts that she (and other widows of War of 1812 veterans) are not entitled to land under Tennessee law. Signed: Andrew Jackson. [Note: Pvt. Morris Freil of Col. Benton's Second Regiment, Tennessee Militia, died on February 7, 1813 as a result of a boating accident on the Mississippi River.] 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 152. Autograph cover of Andrew Jackson addressed to the [Honorable] Felix Grundy, Esqr., [US Senator], Nashville, Tennessee. [1826]. Written at a time when Jackson was a private plantation owner. This was carried by Lyncoya, whose name appears on the cover. [Note: Lyncoya was found on the Tallushatchee battlefield by Brig. Genl. Coffee's troops and was subsequently sent by Maj. Genl. Andrew Jackson to the Hermitage as his ward.] 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 153. Confidential letter from Duff Green, [prominent editor], Washington, [DC], to unknown recipient. 1827 Oct. 19. Green recommends that Andrew Jackson ask Congress to have such part of Jackson's correspondence with the War Department concerning the six militiamen which had been withdrawn from the files be replaced. He points out that only Jackson knows when they were withdrawn and "no person but himself can supply the deficiency". [Jackson's order to have the six militiamen in question executed during the War of 1812 had become part of a smear campaign during the Presidential election.] Signed: Duff Green. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 154. Letter from James K. Polk ([Member of Congress]), Washington City, [DC], to [Peter] Hagner, Auditor, Treasury [Department]. 1828 Dec. 11. Polk asks whether the widow of Merrill Little, a former soldier who served in the War of 1812 [as a Private] in Capt. Willie [Huddlestow?]'s company in Col. [Reston?]'s Regiment of [Maj. Genl. Carroll's] Tennessee Militia Infantry of the US Army, is entitled to her husband's arrears of pay and proceeds of "two guns & some clothing belonging to him [which] were sold by the U. States officers at Nashville, Tennessee". [Pvt.] Merrill died in February 1814 or 1815. He further requests that if anything is due Mrs. Little, he be given instructions on obtaining it. Signed: James K. Polk. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 155. Appointment of William B. Lewis of Tennessee as Second Auditor in the Treasury Department by President Andrew Jackson, with print (book illustration) of portrait of Jackson. 1829 Mar. 21, and 1870. The appointment is a large, handwritten, formal document, with a seal. Signed: Andrew Jackson. Countersigned: James A Hamilton (underneath in another hand: Acting Secretary of State). [William B. Lewis was formerly Maj. and Adjutant Deputy Quarter Master General of the Tennessee Militia.] The portrait, an engraving (steel?) is a three-quarter length portait of Jackson shown seated facing lightly left with left arm resting on table next to him. He wears a shirt with winged collar, tie, vest, jacket, and overcoat. Opened book lies face down on table. He holds eyeglasses(?) and case in his hands. Sketchy architectural details visible in background. Right side torn from book. Two tabs from framing or matting attached at top. Inscriptions across bottom: "Entered according to act of Congress A.D. 1870 by Johnson Wilson & Co. in the clerks office of the district court of the southern district of NY"; "From the original painting by Chappel in the possession of the publisher"; "Johnson, Wilson & Co., Publishers, New York"; and facsimile signature of Andrew Jackson. The engraving is a copy of an original oil painting by [Alonzo?] Chappel, done ca. 1865. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 156. Letter from [Sen.] Edward Livingston, Montgomery [Place?], N.Y., to [Arsène] Lacarrière Latour, Esq., care of John [Mordock Esq.?], [Mencht?], Havanna [sic], [Cuba]. 1830 Aug. 1. Livingston states that the press of Jackson's friends for government positions had been overwhelming. Signed: Edw. Livingston. [Arsène LaCarrière-Latour had been Chief Topographical Engineer during the Gulf Campaign of the War of 1812. He had written Jackson asking for an appointment as U.S. Consul to Cuba.] 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 157. Letter from []William B.] Lewis, [Second Auditor, Treasury Department], Washington, [DC], to the Hon. James Buchanan, [Member of Congress], Washington, [DC]. 1831 Jan. 31. Lewis, on behalf of the President, [Andrew Jackson], asks Buchanan to extend to Genl. Porter of Lancaster the offer of an appointment as Marshall for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania as evidence of the President's friendship. He would prefer to offer something better, but this is the only appointment worthy of Porter's attention in the Eastern section of the state. He is unsure of the salary, but believes it to be between two and three thousand dollars. Signed: W. B. Lewis. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 158. Appointment by President Andrew Jackson of John Coffee of Alabama as Surveyor of the Public Lands in the State of Alabama. 1831 July 9. Formal, handwritten document with Presidential seal. Signed: Andrew Jackson. Countersigned: Edw. [Edward] Livingston (underneath in another hand is written "Secretary of State"). [Note: Coffee was formerly Brigadier General of the Tennessee Mounted Gunmen in the War of 1812.] 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 159. Note from Edward Livingston, [Minister Plenipotentiary to France], to Major [Arsène] Lacarrière Latour. 1835 Apr. 14. Livingston thanks him for the wine and sends him warm wishes. Signed: Edw. Livingston. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 160. Map, [hand-drawn by General F. Maunsell (85th Light Infantry, British Army)]. Sketch of the attack on the lines in advance of New Orleans. [1835]. Pen and ink with gouache. Hand-drawn map showing British and American troop positions and movement during the Battle of New Orleans. Shows bird's-eye view of battlefield and surrounding area [currently Chalmette Battlefield and National Cemetery]; Mississippi River; Lower Coast Algiers; naval ships on river; batteries; land features; location of structures along Mississippi. Inset with title information and scale information given in toises. Additional inset with key to map. Inscription, left side, top to bottom, watermark: Weatherly / 1835. [Note: Laid in: George Gleig's "A Narrative of the Campaigns of the British Army at Washington and New Orleans..., London: John Murray, 1821.] 1 item.

Folder 161. Letter from President [Andrew Jackson] to Governor [Lewis] Cass, [Secretary of War]. 1835 May 13. Jackson encloses the report of Col. Robert Butler, former Adjutant General, concerning American troop dispositions on 1815 Jan. 8. In Jackson's hand, but unsigned. Report not included. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 162. Letter from Edw. [Edward] Livingston, [Retiring Minister Plenipotentiary to France], to Major [Arsène Lacarrière] Latour. 1835 Oct. 27. Livingston regrets that it was not possible to visit before departing, writes that he would write Anthony Butler, [Charge d'Affairs to Mexico and formerly Col. 2nd Rifle Co., US Army], concerning his business and ending with comments on wine. (Latour has written on the back "M. Livingston on Wine".) Signed: Edw. Livingston. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 163. Letter from Geo[rge] Holland Marble, Natchez, to [his cousin?], the Hon[orable] John L. Putnam, Cornish, Newhampshire [sic]. 1835 Dec. 28. Marble describes his trip to New Orleans and to the Chalmette battlefield, including the vivid memories of Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans that the visit to Chalmette brings up. He did not like New Orleans in past visits, but is better pleased with it this time. He finds the winter weather pleasant. He is doing business with the "first mercantile Houses in town in order to become acquainted with the manners and customs of the natives and their manner of doing business". He is particularly surprised and appalled that businesses are open on Sundays; he gives as the reason the need to serve steamboat travelers. He writes the latest news he has heard of the fighting in Texas and the many taken prisoner by the Mexicans, mentioning that volunteers from New Orleans were among these. He is anxious for a letter from Putnam, because he has had no news of friends and relations back home. Signed: Geo. Holland Marble. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 164. Letter from Edw[ard] Livingston, [retired to "Montgomery Place" on the Hudson River], New-York, to Monsieur [Arsène] Lacarrière Latour, Chez M. Ruelle, Paris [which has been crossed out and replaced in another hand with Aurillac], [France]. 1835 Dec. 31. Livingston writes regarding accountability of funds which were placed in the hands of the E. J. Company. He also advises Latour that he will write the new Minister of Mexico, Powhattan Ellis, about the business; however, he requires clarification concerning the most recent communications with Col. Anthony Butler. Signed: Edw. Livingston. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 165. Letter from G. Thompson, [former USMC officer], Plaquemine, Iberville, La., to His Excellency Andrew Jackson, Washington City, [DC]. 1836 Jan. 10. Thompson discusses his prior Marine Corps service and knowledge gained in the construction of war ships during the War of 1812, and indicates his desire to volunteer [for the second Seminole War], asking particularly for an appointment as "Purveyor, or Superintendant of Public Timber for the Western District of Louisiana embracing the Islands, Bayous, Bays & Inlets on that Coast..." Signed: G. Thompson. Envelope separate. 5 pp. 2 items.

Folder 166. Letter from [Col. or Cold] Steel, [New Orleans?] to The Editor of the U.S. Journal, H. Colburn, Esqre., [London, England]. 1836 Feb. 3. The writer comments on Major Mitchell's comments in the journal that Genl. Jackson's lines on 1815 Jan. 8 [Battle of New Orleans] could not have been taken by bayonet alone. In his discussion of the British loss at the Battle of New Orleans, he focuses in-depth on how the British use the bayonet, what type they use, and how they are trained. He compares the Battle of New Orleans with battles in Raga [in the Sudan] and Rathcormack, [Co. Cork, Ireland], which, he says, had similar terrains and defenses. Signed: [Col. or Cold] Steel. 3 pp. 1 item.

Folder 167. Circular letter from [Isaac] Chauncey, Acting Secretary of the Navy, Navy Department, to [in this instance] Chas. [Charles] Stewart, Commandant Navy Yard, Philadelphia, [Pa.]. 1839 Aug. 27. Chauncey orders naval facilities to fly the flags at half-mast in honor of the late Commodore Daniel T. Patterson, with "thirteen minute guns to be fired at noon on the day after the receipt of this order". He further orders that officers wear crepe on the left arm for 30 days. Signed: I. Chauncey. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 168. Autograph note of Andrew Jackson. 1840 Jan. 11. The note is a quote of [Stephen] Decatur: "Our Country right or wrong -- (Decatur)", signed and dated by Jackson: Andrew Jackson, New Orleans, January 11th 1840. [Note: This is the only known manuscript from Jackson's attendance at the 25th Anniversary celebration of the Battle of New Orleans held in New Orleans. Jackson at this time was a private plantation owner.] 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 169. Autograph cover from Andrew Jackson addressed to William Arms, Chairman, Captain Mills and others, Charleston, South Carolina. 1841 Dec. 31. Jackson's signature is preceded by the word "free". [Note: Jackson in the letter originally enclosed (not present) declined an invitation to attend the January 8, 1842 Military Ball and proudly stated that SC was the state of his birth.] 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 170. United States Land Grant to Pvt. Abner W. Sansden, Capt. John B. Quarles' Company, Tennessee Volunteers, War of 1812. 1859 July 1. Printed document, filled out by hand. Signed by Pres. Buchanan; signature: James Buchanan. Also signed by J. B. Leonard, [printed: Sec'y.]; and [illegible], [printed: Recorder of the General Land Office]. With Presidential wafer. Notes on filing [and subsequent reassignment?] on verso. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 171. Engraved map with watercolor. Mississippi Territory. 1812. Topographical map showing Mississippi Territory, bounded by the Mississippi River at left, Tennessee at top, Georgia at right, and West Florida at bottom [currently the states of Mississippi and Alabama]. Shows tributaries and rivers flowing from the Mobile River; areas indicated as Upper Mississippi Company, Tennessee Company, Upper Creeks, Georgia Company, Middle Creeks, Chickasaws, Choctaws, Lower Creeks, Natches, etc. Scale is given in miles. Plate from the third edition of Aaron Arrowsmith and Samuel Lewis' New and Elegant General Atlas . Boston. Thomas & Andrews, 1812. (Note: black and white only are used.). 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 172. Snuffbox, Treaty of Ghent: December 25th, 1814. Ca. 1815. Lacquered papier-maché snuffbox with attached engraving with watercolor, English. Round lacquered snuffbox with allegorical scene of the signing of the Treaty of Ghent [which ended the War of 1812] on lid. Shows central female figure, Columbia representing America, standing and pointing to left where two British military officials in uniform with red jackets stand next to and lean over signing treaty, on wood podium with angled top. At left is seated female figure, Britannia representing Great Britain, with her head bent forward in her left hand; the British lion lies at her feet. Above these figures hovers a female figure with wings, representing Victory/ Nike, holding wreath above the head of Columbia. At right stand two military officials in uniform with blue jackets. At far right is British naval tall sailing ship with sails raised. Just behind Columbia is image of an American eagle. In far distance is unidentified structure. 1 item.

Folder 173. Engraving, "Battle of New Orleans and Death of Major General Packenham [sic] On the 8th of January 1815." [1816 or 1817?]. [Note: Fourth state. Black and White as issued.] Exterior view of battle scene between American and British troops at the Battle of New Orleans, currently the Chalmette Battlefield and Natural Cemetery. Shows battle scene with lines of troops firing, some advancing, at opposing side with muskets and cannons, filling the scene with smoke. American and British flags are visible. In foreground is death scene of General Pakenham; he reclines on ground supported by and surrounded by other British officers. One holds the reins of his horse, another [Gen. Lambert] points to the right with his hand across his head, and another carries the British flag. On either side, soldiers lie dead or dyign. Key identifies: Staff Doctor, Captain of the Regulars, Sir E. Packenham's [sic] Horse, Gen. Gibbs - Mortally Wounded, Colonel Thornton, American Battery, Major Genl. Sir E. Packenham [sic] shot, Major McDougall Aid de Camp, Major General Lambert, Ensign bearing the British flag, H.T. Shaw Brigade Major Wounded, Major General Keene, Col. Blakeney comr. of the Fusiliers. Just below battle scene in center of title information is bust-length portrait of Andrew Jackson in uniform. On either side of Jackson are military/battle symbols including cannons, cannon balls, American flags, muskets, and swords. The engraving was taken from an original painting by Benjamin West. 1 item.

Folder 174. Historical map (engraving). United States of America. Exhibiting the Seat of War on the Canadian Frontier from 1812-1815. [1816?]. London. Engraved by [Samuel John?] Neele. Copper engraving with watercolor. View of eastern United States and Canada showing topographical features and borders including those labelled: Louisiana, West Florida, E. Florida, Missisippi [sic] Territory, Georgia, S. Carolina, Tenasee [sic], North Carolina, Kentucky, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delware, New York, Jersey [sic], Connecticut, Massachusets [sic], New Hampshire, Rhode Island, District of Main [sic], Upper Canada, Lower Canada, Acadia, Nova Scotia. Inset map entitled: Chart of Lakes Erie and Ontario on an enlarged scale. Scale given in British miles. One folded shut. Most likely removed from text: The Wars of the French Revolution by Edward Baines (Leeds: several editions printed). Inscriptions: Bottom right, on support, in pencil: S. J. Neele, London, 1816. 1 item.

Folder 175. Historical map. Southern Provinces of the United States. [Published 1817]. Engraving with watercolor. View of eastern United States from Mississippi River to Atlantic Ocean, from north Florida to southern border of New York State. Shows topographic features, Indian tribes and nations, and borders, including those identified as: West Florida, E. Florida, Georgia, S. Carolina, Tenasee [sic], North Carolina, Kentucky, Virginia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Jersey [sic], Long Island, Louisiana, Lake Erie. Inset image entitled: Characteristic Scenery of the Hudson River. View of river and rocky riverbank with cliffs and foliage, small sailing boats on river, and structure on riverbank at river's edge. Scale given in British Statute miles. One folded sheet removed from New General Atlas by John Thomson. Map is numbered 57. 1 item.

Folder 176. Lithograph. Defeat of the British Army 12000 strong under the Command of Sir Edward Packehnam [sic] in the attack of the American Lines defended by 3,600 Militia commanded by Major General Andrew Jackson January 8th 1815 on Chalmette plain five miles below New Orleans on the left bank of the Mississippi. Ca. 1950. Bird's-eye view of battle scene from Mississippi River edge, currently Chalmette Battlefield and National Cemetery. Shows American and British troops, Macarty plantation, gardens, and grounds at left. Considered to be the most accurate representation of the battle. Original image drawn on the field of battle and painted by Jean Hyacinthe Laclotte, an architect and assistant engineer in the Louisiana Army. This edition includes number key to the following: Jackson's Head Quarters, American Lines, Mississipi [sic] River, British Troops, Cypriss [sic] Swamps, British Batteries. Title information given in English and French. See 1950.58.16i-iii and others for further key to print including identification of figures Major General Andrew Jackson and General in Chief Sir Edward Pakenham. Inscription: verso, bottom left, to to bottom, along side, in pencil: 39607. 1 item.

Folder 177. Snuffbox. New Orleans Defense. Ca. 1815-1820. [Artist and engraver unknown, English]. Papier-maché snuffbox. A lacquered transfer-image [engraving] of the Battle of New Orleans appears on the lid. See folder 178 for similar snuffbox. 1 item.

Folder 178. Snuffbox. New Orleans Defense. Ca. 1815-1820. [Artist and engraver unknown, English.] Papier-maché snuffbox. A lacquered transfer-image [engraving] of the Battle of New Orleans appears on the lid. Identical to snuffbox in folder 177, except that the title is in a different typeface and there are added words: "General Pakenham's death" at the top. 1 item.

Folder 179. Statement Of the Expenditure and Application of all such Sums of Money as have been drawn from the treasury by the Secretary of War, from the 1st of October, 1814, to the 30th of September, inclusive; in virtue of the appropriation laws for the year 1815, and of the unexpended balances of former appropriations for the military establishment remaining in the treasury on the 1st of October, 1814. 1815 Dec. 29. Printed document. Lists expenditures of War Dept.: pay, subsistence, clothing and forage of the army; bounties and premiums; contingencies; ordnance department; Indian department; camp equipage; medical and hospital department; fortifications; Quarter master's department; corps of artificers; pay, subsistence, and forage of rangers; militia, and arming and equipping militia; books and apparatus for the military academy; the military academy; corps of sea fencibles; purchase of artillery horses; Wabash pensions; Indian annuities; appropriations for the relief of Wm. H. Washington, Jacob Shinnick, Anacosta Bridge Company, James Savage, Wm. Robinson, and others not named; and ascertaining the boundary lines fixed by treaty with the Creek Indians. Expenditures are divided in columns by the time that various amounts for the expenditures were drawn from the treasury, with a column for the balance remaining for that appropriation. Beneath this is a "Recapitulation" stating total amounts used by the War Department, and balance remaining. Signed in print by Tobias Lear, Accountant's Office, Department of War. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 180. Engraving. Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson. Ca. 1819. Waist-length portrait of Major General Andrew Jackson in military uniform with general's epaulets. He is shown in near three-quarter view facing left. Inscriptions: Bottom left: S. L. Waldo, pinxt. [painter]; bottom right: P. Maverick, sculpt. [engraver]; top left, on support, in pencil 100- ; bottom right, on support, in pencil: 2208/J; verso, top left, in pencil: 45- . (New York: ca. 1819). 1 item.

Folder 181. Broadside. Jackson at New Orleans. Adams at Ghent. 1828. This is a pro-Jackson broadside from the 1828 US Presidential election. At the top of the page is a caricature or political cartoon of General Andrew Jackson defending America from the British while John Quincy Adams sneaks away with money from the treasury. Below this are two columns, one titled "Jackson at New Orleans", the other "Adams at Ghent." The Jackson side quotes testimonials to his character or fitness from public office, including quotes from Jackson proponents Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe (stating that he so believes Jackson should be President that he himself refrained from running); quotes concerning their high opinion of Jackson from anti-Jacksonians John Quincy Adams (the opposing candidate), Henry Clay, (Baltimore) Weekly Register editor Hezekiah Niles, Baltimore Patriot editor Isaac Monroe; and an excerpt of a letter from William H. Crawford denying that he wrote a letter approving of Adams' administration. It ends with a reply Jackson made to a toast in his honor during a visit to Baltimore in 1819. The Adams side is a letter from John Quincy Adams, Ghent, 16th November, 1814, to Levitt Harris, Esq. Charge d'Affairs of the United States, St. Petersburg, and expresses a low opinion of the US armed forces and predicts defeat at the hands of the British. Annotation on verso: Jackson & Adams. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 182. Handbill. Jackson's Victory at New Orleans. 1828. Poem in two columns "Composed by Hezekiah Wakeman, of Redding, Conn.", in which Wakeman rejoices in Jackson's election as President, and John Quincy Adams' loss in the race, and then goes on to describe at length Jackson's "glorious conduct" at the Battle of New Orleans. Beneath these in one column is a "Republican Toast", toasting the US armed forces at the Battle of New Orleans, President Jackson, the ladies of New Orleans, ladies in general, and the spectators at the Battle of New Orleans. Signature on verso: Hezekiah Wakeman, [illegible]. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 183. Commemorative Print on Silk. Ca. 1828. Framed print celebrating the election of Andrew Jackson and placing him in the pantheon of American Presidents. Jackson's portrait is in the center. The text below the portrait reads: "Andrew Jackson / Magnanimous in Peace / Victorious in War." Additional text frames Jackson's portrait: "President of the United States from March 4 1829 -- / Supreme Commander of the Army and Navy." Other presidential portraits feature George Washington (1789-97), John Adams (1797-1801), Thomas Jefferson (1801-09), James Madison (1809-17), James Monroe (1817-25), and John Quincy Adams (1825-29). An American eagle and an US Navy frigate are also shown. 1 item.

Folder 184. Lithograph. The President Jackson. By J[ules] Lion. Ca. 1840. Bust-length portrait of Andrew Jackson. He is shown in three-quarters view, facing left, wearing shirt with high collar, stock, waistcoat, and frock coat with high collar and large lapels. [Note: Andrew Jackson visited New Orleans in January 1840 to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans. He sat for Lion, a French-born free man of color, who made at least three different images of Jackson, of which this is one, perhaps as a result of this sitting. In this image Jackson appears much younger than he would have during his visit to New Orleans.] Inscription: Bottom right: Imp. [Imprimerie (printing house)] D'Aubert et de Junca; bottom left: JLion. 1 item.

Folder 185. Handbill. Wooden Breast Bone, and Jackson's Victory. Ca. 1845. Circular containing two poems in separate columns, the first satirizing the use of the Wooden Breast Bone, apparently a type of corset used to keep the female back straight; the second, a tribute to Jackson's victory in the form of a ballad with verses and a chorus. Sold by L. Deming, Boston. 1 item.

Folder 186. Silk sash. Battle of New Orleans. Ca. 1884. Five scenes depicting the Battle of New Orleans printed on silk sash. Signed (probably printed): O.M. Spofford [Mrs. Ophelia Martin Spofford]. (New Orleans: ca. 1884.) [Thought to have been made for the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, 1884-85.] 1 item.

Folder 187. Color lithograph (chromolithograph). 1813-XIV-1821. General; Staff & Line Officers; Light Artillery (1813-1816). c. 1885. View of United States Army officers in uniform. Officers and uniforms represented include General, Staff and Line Officers, and Light Artillery (1813-1816). Officers stand around seated General, one of whom is saluting as general is handing him a note. [It is possible that the likeness of Andrew Jackson was used for the seated General.] Plate 14 of 44 published in portfolio form with accompanying text by Henry Loomis Nelson under the title The Army of the United States . Several editions of this title were published, including those in 1885 and 1888. This lithograph is a copy of a painting of the same name by Henry Ogden Alexander. Inscriptions: (i) bottom left, in original print: H. A. Ogden; (ii) bottom left, on support: Copyright 18815 by Brig. Gen'l. S. B. Holabird, Qr. Master Gen'l. U.S.A.; (iii) bottom right, on support: Lith. By Buek & Co. N.Y.; (iv) top left, on support, in pencil: RFOCT.. 1 item.


COFFIN BROADSIDES


On 21 February, 1815, a general court martial convicted six militia men of disobeying orders; they were later executed at Fort Charlotte, Mobile. Approximately thirty days prior to the execution, Maj. Genl. Jackson had reviewed the sentence and let it stand. This decision came back to haunt him during his presidential campaign of 1828, when supporters of John Adams' candidacy accused Jackson of murder. In what was probably the first national smear campaign, printed handbills--also called broadsides--spread these accusations to the public, and added additional charges of brawling, dueling, and slaving. Twenty-seven surviving broadsides have been located nationally, seventeen of which are included in this series, the largest such collection extant.

Folder 188. Coffin broadside. Monumental Inscriptions! These Inscriptions, compiled from authentic sources, but principally from Official Documents, communicated by the Department of War to Congress, on the 25th of January 18288, are, in this form, submitted to the serious consideration of the American People... 1828. This broadside, printed during the 1828 Presidential campaign, tells voters that candidate Andrew Jackson is unfit for the office of President. He is said to have "illegally and wantonly shed the blood of his countrymen and fellow soldiers" by ordering six militiamen executed on 1815 Feb. 21 after a military trial in which they were convicted after leaving camp to return home, although their tours of duty were not up. After an initial paragraph, there are six engravings of coffins (two rows of three), with memorials to each of the soldiers shot, giving details of their lives and deaths. The soldiers memorialized are: Edward Lindsey, Henry Lewis, David Morrow, Jacob Webb, John Harris, and David Hunt. The broadside stresses that they realized their error, returned to camp voluntarily, and offered to resume their service. Below the coffins is an anonymous poem, "Mournful Tragedy". (John Binns, Philadelphia: 1828) [Note: It is believed this was the first coffin broadside to be issued. The publisher was John Binns, editor and publisher of the Democratic Press in Philadelphia.] 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 189. Coffin broadside. Mournful Tragedy or, The Death of Jacob Webb, David Morrow, John Harris, Henry Lewis, David Hunt, and Edward Lindsay, Six Militia Men who were condemned to die, the sentence approved by Major General Jackson, and by his order the whole six shot. 1828 July. At the top of the page, the title is interspersed with six coffins, without initials, names, or text in the coffins. Beneath this, in two columns of typeset text, is a poem describing the deaths of the six militia men, emphasizing a prayer for mercy by John Harris. A footnote at the bottom of the page gives a brief biography of Harris, who was a preacher, and describes one of his many sons, also in the army, returning home with news of his father's execution. At the bottom of the page: Boston, July 1828. The entire text and illustrations are surrounded by a black border. 1 item.

Folder 190. Coffin broadside. A Brief Account of the Execution Of the Six Militia Men. [1828]. [Broadside used by those who opposed Andrew Jackson and supported John Quincy Adams in the 1828 US Presidential election. This broadside was printed as an addition to the Democratic Press newspaper, Philadelphia, John Binns, publisher.] At the top of the page, the title is interspersed with six coffins, without initials, names, or text in the coffins. Below this are four columns of typeset text concerning the execution of six militia men under Jackson's command in 1815, containing articles originally printed in the Democratic Press. First, it gives in great detail what is said to be an eyewitness account of their deaths. It emphasizes the uncontrollable and "feminine" grief of [John] Harris at leaving his family, and the bravery of [Henry] Lewis, who was not killed by the first round of shots and lived another four days. According to this account, Col. Russell was in charge of the execution and is challenged to come forward with his version. The article points out the irony that the executions occurred the same day as Jackson's triumphal return to New Orleans. The next, "The Six Militia Men", discusses the fact that the official documents pertaining to the case were put in possession of the Speaker [of the House], and five days later, announced to the House [of Representatives]. The third section, "The Case of Sergeant Morrow", gives an outline of the case of [David] Morrow, one of the militia men executed; according to this account when he left camp, he thought his tour of duty over; when he discovered the error, he freely surrendered himself to Gen. Taylor, who gave him a pardon, on the conditions that he return to his post and that his commanding officer agree; Morrow acted as a witness in the trials of the other men; and three unnamed high-ranking officers testified on his behalf at his own trial. The last section is "Extract of a letter to the Editors, dated Washington City, Jan. 30, 1823", discussing the Jacksonites' opposition to the printing of the official documents pertaining to the case presented to the House [of Representatives] by the Speaker. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 191. Coffin broadside. A Brief Account of the Execution Of the Six Militia Men. [1828]. This is the same as the broadside in folder 190, except that it omits the final extract from the letter to the editors, dated Washington City, Jan. 30, 1828. [Broadside used by those who opposed Andrew Jackson and supported John Quincy Adams in the 1828 US Presidential election. This broadside was printed as an addition to the Democratic Press newspaper, Philadelphia, John Binns, publisher.] At the top of the page, the title is interspersed with six coffins, without initials, names, or text in the coffins. Below this are four columns of typeset text concerning the execution of six militia men under Jackson's command in 1815, containing articles originally printed in the Democratic Press. First, it gives in great detail what is said to be an eyewitness account of their deaths. It emphasizes the uncontrollable and "feminine" grief of [John] Harris at leaving his family, and the bravery of [Henry] Lewis, who was not killed by the first round of shots and lived another four days. According to this account, Col. Russell was in charge of the execution and is challenged to come forward with his version. The article points out the irony that the executions occurred the same day as Jackson's triumphal return to New Orleans. The next, "The Six Militia Men", discusses the fact that the official documents pertaining to the case were put in possession of the Speaker [of the House], and five days later, announced to the House [of Representatives]. The third section, "The Case of Sergeant Morrow", gives an outline of the case of [David] Morrow, one of the militia men executed; according to this account when he left camp, he thought his tour of duty over; when he discovered the error, he freely surrendered himself to Gen. Taylor, who gave him a pardon, on the conditions that he return to his post and that his commanding officer agree; Morrow acted as a witness in the trials of the other men; and three unnamed high-ranking officers testified on his behalf at his own trial. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 192. Coffin broadside. Some Further Account of Some of the Bloody Deeds of General Jackson, Being a Supplement to the "Coffin Handbill". By John Taliaferro, Member of Congress, Northern Neck, Va. [1828]. [Broadside used in the 1828 US Presidential election between Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams.] Beneath the title are six black coffins, with the initials of one of the militia men Jackson is accused of sentencing wrongly to death. Below this are two columns of type, separated by a black border. A black mourning border surrounds the whole content. At the bottom of the page is signed in print: John Talliaferro, Member of Congress from Northern Neck, Va. Talliaferro. In the text, Talliaferro makes a variety of wild claims against Jackson, as he describes being an eyewitness to the execution, with such details as the men singing a sixteen-verse song with chorus while waiting to be shot; claims that Jackson had the coffins dug up and shipped to New Orleans, where he ate the executed militiamen; claims as he possesses, like other eye-witnesses, "the same remarkable power of ubiquity", also saw the execution in Nashville of seven regular soldiers who committed no crime at all; claims to have witnessed the execution of several men for a variety of other offences, such as drawing a gun on a commanding officer, inciting Indians to attack Americans, and burning men alive; and claims that Jackson massacred and ate an entire Indian village, after sleeping among the dead bodies. He ends by pleading with his constituents not to vote for Jackson. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 193. Coffin broadside. (Recto): An Account of Some of the Bloody Deeds of General Jackson. (Verso): The Trial of the Six Militia Men, taken from Official Papers, as reported by the Secretary of War on Mr. Sloan's Resolution. [1928]. [Broadside used by those who opposed Andrew Jackson and supported John Quincy Adams in the 1828 US Presidential election.] (Recto): The title is followed by a paragraph of text pertaining to Mr. Sloane of Ohio's Resolution [in the House of Representatives] to call on the Secretary of War to produce all official documents pertaining to the executions of six militia men court-martialed in 1814 Dec. Below this are six vertical coffins, each with the name of one of the militia men executed above it. This is followed by "A Brief Account of the Execution of the Six Militia Men", which stresses the "feminine weakness" of John Harris, a Baptist preacher, and the bravery of Henry Lewis, who survived for four days after the shooting. Below this is a poem, "Mournful Tragedy, or, the death of Jacob Webb, David Morrow, John Harris, Henry Lewis, David Hunt, and Edward Lindsey...", followed by a row of six horizontal coffins. The next block of text describes the execution of seven regular soldiers near Nashville, and a fight Jackson is said to have had in Nashville with Samuel Jackson, who died by Jackson's sword. Below this is a black border, and three blocks of text divided from each other by black borders. The first, having a horizontal coffin above it, describes Jackson's court martial of [?] Woods for disobeying an order, ending in Woods' death. The next describes the massacre by Jackson of an Indian village on 1814 Mar. 27. The third, having four vertical coffins above it, continues the description of the death of the Indians. These are followed by another black border, beneath which is a letter of 1818 Sept. 10 by Thomas Hart Benton, Lieut Col. 39th Infantry, at the time of printing a Senator, describing a fight he had with Jackson. (Verso): Title across top, followed by two columns of text of extracts from the official papers pertaining to the court martial and execution of the six militia men, all prejudicial to Jackson. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 194. The New-Hampshire Journal (Concord, New Hampshire), vol. III, no. 111. Jacob B. Moore, publisher. 1828 Oct. 30. The entire front page has the look and text of the "coffin broadside" by John Binn known as "Monumental Inscriptions". (See folder 188 for Binn's original.) [Coffin broadsides were used against Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential race by forces in favor of John Quincy Adams; they focused on six militia men court-martialed and executed while under Jackson's command in 1815 Dec.] Beneath the headline Monumental Inscriptions is a brief paragraph telling the American people they cannot trust Jackson with the Presidency. Beneath this are detailed engravings of six coffins (two rows of three), each with a lengthy inscription about life and death one of the six militia men executed (Jacob Webb, David Hunt, Edward Lindsey, Henry Lewis, John Harris, and David Morrow), all blaming Jackson for their deaths. Below this is a memorial poem, "Mournful Tragedy", describing the execution and blaming Jackson. On verso are several articles endorsing the "National Republican Ticket" of John Quincy Adams (for president) and Richard Rush (for vice-president) and opposing the "Blood & Carnage Ticket" of Andrew Jackson (for president) and John C. Calhoun (for vice-president), all bringing up information about their pasts; among the issues brought up are use and mis-use of public funds by the candidates, Jackson's role in the slave trade, quotes against Jackson by those who have known him (including Sen. Thomas Hart Benson), more about the executed militia men, and Jackson's history of corruption. There is a particularly lengthy section on Rush's background and qualifications. The last column predicts a win for Adams, partly based on recent elections of Adams supporters in Northern states. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 195. Supplement to the N. Hampshire Patriot & State Gazette. (Concord, N. H.). 1828 Mar. 3. The articles in this supplement are in favor of Andrew Jackson for president in the 1828 election against John Quincy Adams, and are largely refutations of pamphlets, handbills, and broadsides printed against Andrew Jackson by Adams' supporters. They specifically name Jacob B. Moore and John Binns as printers of these. The articles include (recto): "Murder Will Out", which describes a "secret circular from Jacob B. Moore", which, they say, explains how the Adams' supporters are organizing "Committees of Vigilance" to spy on and denounce Jackson supporters; "The Literary Fund", in which they state that if Adams wins the federal Literary Fund would be given over entirely to Dartmouth College, which then would serve as a partisan establishment for the federalists; "Rev. Abraham Burnham", which contains extracts from a sermon given by Burnham 1814 Apr. 14 at Pembroke, "in which he attempted to demonstrate that the Republican Administration of Madison was the reign of Antichrist"; (verso): Burnham article continues; untitled paragraph expressing outrage at the lies printed in a pamphlet "An impartial and true history of the life and service of Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson"; "From the N. H. Gazette", which discusses at length Jackson's duel with Charles Dickinson in Nashville in 1806, including documents signed by their seconds; "For the N.H. Patriot, Langley Boardman, Esq.", a letter to the editor from "A Democrat", concerning the federalist nomination of the Hon. Langley Boardman as candidate for Counsellor for his district and giving a review of Boardman's pro-Adams voting record; an untitled extract of a letter from Washington concerning the "deliberate intention" of Adams' supporters in Congress to further their candidate's causes in a "most harsh and intemperate character"; an untitled extract of a letter from Andover, 1828 Feb. 28, complaining about the distribution of "scurillous [sic] sheets headed with six coffins, from Binns' Press" [known now as coffin broadsides]; and an untitled paragraph about Jacob B. Moore's hand in the printing and distribution of coffin broadsides. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 196. Supplement to the Newport Spectator. "A brief account of the Execution of the Six Militia Men". (Newport, N. H.). [1828]. This newspaper supplement, dating from the 1828 Presidential election between Andrew Jackson and John Quincy Adams quotes and discusses other newspapers and publications about Jackson; this document is pro-Jackson. In the first article, in refutation of articles and handbills printed by John Binns accusing Jackson in lurid terms of wrongly executing six militia men in 1815, they print the answers to a list of questions submitted to Col. C.G. Russell, who was said in Binns' publications to be in charge of the executions and who was a supporter of Adams; Russell reports he was in charge of the executions, but Maj. Gen. M'Intosh was the commanding officer; that the men shot were hired for six months, not three as reported; that it is unlikely that the men had an opportunity to write to Jackson to plead for their lives, as claimed; that [John] Harris, though a minister, was more mischievous than reported; that he believed the charges were proved positively and believes without a shadow of a doubt the men were guilty as charged; that the militia officers were still in fear of another British attack; that approximately 192 more militia men were convicted of desertion at the same time, but not executed because they were thought to be simply followers of the six executed; and that he considers charges that they should not have been shot "absurd". A brief article reports a similar execution of a militia man during the Revolution under Gen. Washington's command. The next article, in refutation of an article about the six militia men in the Baltimore Republican, apparently by Judge Chapman Johnson, discusses how militia men were recruited during the Creek war in 1813 and after, quoting official documents, in proving that the six executed militia men were signed up for longer than they claimed; they also quote Col. Pipkin as stating that before leaving, the militia men "demolished the bake house, destroyed the oven, and did many other disorderly and mutinous acts", some of which he lists, many of which were events that could lead to court-martial; they further quote government documents that one can be court-martialed after their tour of duty is up; this article is signed by "Brutus". This article continues onto verso. Also on verso: two untitled paragraphs taking Binns to task for his "wretched, slight of hand tricks" in making the executions sound like murders. The next article, responding to the United States Telegraph of Feb. 12th, titled "A Signal Triumph", discusses the publication of the War Dept. documents concerning the case of the militia men. In the third column, under the title "The Contrast", they contrast John Quincy Adams' pessimism about America's chances of victory in the War of 1812 with Jackson's strong belief that America would win. The next paragraph "$52,000 at stake at the March election!", concerns the Federalists' intentions of turning over the [federal?] Literary Fund to Dartmouth College, a federalist institution. Beneath this is an untitled paragraph concerning a quote by a federalist that 'the democrats do all the business for us". Lastly two paragraphs titled "District Attorney", asks why a new District Attorney for their district has not been appointed, wondering if Adams is waiting for the results of the March election. 2 pp. 1 item.

Folder 197. Coffin broadside. "An Account of some of the Bloody Deeds of Gen. Jackson." [1828]. Beneath the title are 184 black coffins of varying sizes, and in the center of the page is a coffin-shaped cartouche containing the text titled "Sacred to the Memory of Sir E. Pakenham and 2500 Officers and Soldiers of His Majexty the King of Great Britain, who, on the Eighth of January, 1815, were condemned without even the benefits of a Drum Head Court Martial, and cruelly shot to death, by Andrew Jackson, A Sanguinary Military Chieftain". The rest of the text satirizes the "coffin broadsides" [broadsides that depicted coffins and accused Andrew Jackson of unjustly executing six militia men in 1815; they were printed by supporters of John Quincy Adams in the presidential election of 1828.] It accuses Jackson of killing those who had come to teach Americans "the blessings of a monarchy", and describes the Battle of New Orleans in the same sort of lurid language used in the coffin broadsides by Jackson's opponents. The entire text and illustrations are surrounded by a black mourning border. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 198. Coffin broadside. A Brief Account of Some of the Bloody Deed of General Jackson. [1828]. [Coffin broadsides were used against Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential race by forces in favor of John Quincy Adams; they focused on six militia men court-martialed and executed while under Jackson's command in 1815 Dec.] This broadside shows, under the title, six coffins, each with the name of an executed militia man above it. The coffins are flanked with a soldier at attention on each side of the page. Beneath this is a paragraph accusing Jackson of unfairly executing them, and introducing an excerpt from the 1828 Feb. 2 issue of the Democratic Press, in which an eye-witness describes the executions. Below this paragraph, in two columns is the excerpt, under the title "A Brief Account of the Execution of the Six Militia Men", which stresses that they believed their tour of duty up and that they were innocent, as well as describing the distress of [John] Harris, a Baptist preacher with a large family, and bravery of [Henry] Lewis, who survived four days after the shooting. There is a black border between the two columns. Below this, separated by another black border are two sections, also separated by black border. The first shows seven coffins, with a soldier at attention on either end, beneath which is a paragraph about the execution of seven regular soldiers under Jackson's command. The second shows one horizontal coffin, beneath which is a paragraph about John Woods, who was also executed for disobeying orders while under Jackson's command. Under another black border are two more sections, separated by yet another black border. The first shows an illustration of one man caning or beating another, next to which is a paragraph about Jackson making an assault on Samuel Jackson in Nashville. The second shows four vertical coffins, under which is a paragraph about Jackson killing Indians. Beneath another black border are two last sections, again separated by black border. The first accuses Jackson of an unprovoked massacre of an Indian village, including women and children. This continues into the second section. The whole of the text and illustrations of the entire page are surrounded by a black mourning border. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 199. [Coffin broadside.] Some account of some of the Bloody Deeds of General Jackson. [1928]. [Coffin broadsides were used against Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential race by forces in favor of John Quincy Adams; they focused on six militia men court-martialed and executed while under Jackson's command in 1815 Dec.] Beneath the title are six upright coffins, each with the name of one of the militia men above it (Jacob Webb, David Morrow, John Harrris, Henry Lewis, David Hunt, and Edward Lindsey). Beneath this are five columns titled "A brief account of the Execution of Six Militia Men", a description of the execution by an eye-witness, stressing the wrongness of the conviction, the "feminine weakness" of Baptist preacher [John] Harris, and the bravery of [Henry] Lewis, who lived several days after the shooting. [This account was originally published by John Binns in the Democratic Press newspaper; most broadsides using it give the paper credit, but this one does not.] Directly beneath this is a poem about their deaths, "Mournful Tragedy", in six columns. Below this is a black border, beneath with are three asymmetrical sections, divided from each other by black borders. In one section are seven vertical coffins, followed by a caricature of Jackson caning or beating another man. There are two segments of text in this section: beneath the coffins is an account of Jackson's "sanguinary massacre" of a peaceful Indian village; next to the caricature is a paragraph about Jackson assaulting Samuel Jackson in the streets of Nashville. In another section, under a horizontal coffin, is an account of the case of John Woods who was executed while under Jackson's command for disobeying an officer "who was not Woods' equal at home". The third section, beneath four vertical coffins, describes Jackson's hanging of four Indians without a trial. Below these sections is another black horizontal border, beneath which is a letter written by Thomas Hart Benton, 1818 Sept. 10, at which time he was a Lieut. Col., 39th Infantry, describing a gun fight he had with Jackson and others in 1818; at the time of publication of this broadside, Benton was a U.S. Senator. The whole of the text and illustrations of the entire broadside are bordered with a black mourning border. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 200. [Coffin broadside.] Some Account of some of the Bloody Deeds of Gen. Jackson. [1828]. [Coffin broadsides were used against Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential race by forces in favor of John Quincy Adams; they focused on six militia men court-martialed and executed while under Jackson's command in 1815 Dec.] Beneath the title are six vertical coffins, each with the name of one of the militia men above it (Jacob Webb, David Morrow, John Harris, Henry Lewis, David Hunt, and Edward Lindsey). Below this in five columns is "A brief account of the Execution of the Six Militia Men", reportedly by an eye-witness, stressing the wrongness of the conviction, the "feminine weakness" of Baptist preacher [John] Harris, and the bravery of [Henry] Lewis, who lived several days after the shooting. [This account was originally published by John Binns in the Democratic Press newspaper; most broadsides using it give the paper credit, but this one does not.] Below this, in six columns is, a poem on the same topic, "Mournful Tragedy". Below this are a block of five smaller articles and illustrations, asymmetrically laid out, and divided by black borders. One shows12 vertical coffins, under which the text, using excerpts from the General Orders, discusses soldiers under Jackson command executed just after the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. Another has a caricature of Jackson caning or beating another man who is falling to the ground [this illustration has been altered from that of most broadsides illustrating this episode]. The text tells of Jackson's assault of Samuel Jackson in the streets of Nashville. Another, under one horizontal coffin, tells the story of John Woods, a soldier under Jackson's command, executed for disobeying "an upstart little officer, who was not Wood's equal at home". A fourth, unillustrated, tells of Jackson massacring an Indian village 1814 Mar. 27. The fifth in this block has four vertical coffins across the top, with text below concerning Indians hung without trial by Jackson's order. Below this block, across the bottom of the page, in two columns, is a letter written by Thomas Hart Benton, 1818 Sept. 10, at which time he was a Lieut. Col., 39th Infantry, describing a gun fight he had with Jackson and others in 1818; at the time of publication of this broadside, Benton was a U.S. Senator. The whole of the text and illustrations of the entire broadside are bordered with a black mourning border. 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 201. [Coffin broadside.] Some Account of some of the Bloody Deeds of Gen. Jackson. Facsimile edition, annotated with personal account by Thomas Hart Benson's daughter on verso. 1896 Mar. 28. [Coffin broadsides were used against Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential race by forces in favor of John Quincy Adams; they focused on six militia men court-martialed and executed while under Jackson's command in 1815 Dec.] This is a facsimile edition, identical to the broadside in folder 200 of this collection, except that the following text has been added to the bottom of the page: Fac-Simile from / R. W. Mercer's Curiosity Store, / No. 147 Central Avenue, Cincinnati, O. / Post Paid, 15 Cents; and on verso is a manuscript annotation, dated 1896 Mar. 28, by Jessie Benton Freemont, Los Angeles, California, to her friend, Horace Rust, stating that on the day Andrew Jackson had a brawl that ended in several shootings with Thomas Hart Benton and his brothers at the Nashville Inn, there was a woman staying there with her son, later General [John Charles] Frémont. When the son grew up and wanted "to marry a daughter of Senator [Thomas Hart] Benton, she [the mother] wrote with imploring distress that he would turn away from such 'blood-thirsty natures'". Signed: Jessie Benton Frémont (now seventy-one). 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 202. Handbill. Is Jackson fit to be President?---Read what follows, and judge ye! [1828?]. [This is a handbill printed by Andrew Jackson's opponents in the 1828 presidential election against John Quincy Adams.] The handbill is two columns with the by-line "From the Kentucky Reporter" and the sub-title "The Combination". It accuses the [Adams] Administration's opposition of a variety of evils, particularly ambition. It then tells the story of Andrew Jackson's brawl with Thomas Hart Benton and others in Nashville, asking if the political opponents of "the principal actor in this bloody outrage" would be safe if elected president. The handbill then contains a letter Benton wrote 1813 Sept .10, when he was a Lieut. Col. 39th Infantry. Benton accuses Jackson of starting the fight by drawing a gun on Benton while Benton was unarmed, and gives an account of the fight, which included several others on both sides. The handbill's editor adds a brief footnote reminding the reader that Benton is now a Senator from Missouri, and that "he is in league with Van Buren & Co. to elevate this same Jackson to the Presidency"; this footnote also accuses Jackson of planning "military rule". 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 203. [Coffin broadside.] Facts Concerning the Six Militia Men and General Jackson. [1828]. [Coffin broadsides were used against Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential race by forces in favor of John Quincy Adams; they focused on six militia men court-martialed and executed while under Jackson's command on 1815 Feb. 21] This broadside tells the story of the six militia men (John Harris, John Webb, David Morrow, Henry Lewis, David Hunt, and Edward Lindsay, all of the Tennessee Militia), making liberal use of official documents of the War Department in a way prejudicial to Jackson. Among the documents quoted are Army General Orders; extracts from the trials; correspondence of Gov. [Willie] Blount, the Secretary of War, General Andrew Jackson, William Harris (son of John Harris), and others. The broadside argues that it was generally believed by even the Secretary of War, the President, and General Jackson, that the Tennessee Militia were signed up for only three months, not six; and that the good conduct of the prisoners and pleas for mercy were not taken into consideration. It ends with a summary of points made in the general text, and a call not to vote for Jackson as being unfit for the office of President. [Note: John Quincy Adams' name is not mentioned, although he is Jackson's opponent.] 1 p. 1 item.

Folder 204. Etching. The Pedlar and his Pack or the Desperate Effort, an Over Balance. [1828]. [An etching depicting John Binns with a load of coffins on his back and a dialogue between Henry Clay and John Q. Adams, all of which refer to the execution of the six militia men. Binns was the printer of the original coffin broadsides. Coffin broadsides were used against Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential race by forces in favor of John Quincy Adams; they focused on six militia men court-martialed and executed while under Jackson's command on 1815 Feb. 2.]. 1 p. 1 item.

Note: See also folders 210-218 below.


Clark Mill's Equestrian Statue of General Andrew Jackson


In the late 1840s, a group of prominent citizens in Washington, D.C. formed a committee to raise funds for a monument dedicated to Andrew Jackson. They selected noted sculptor Clark Mills to design the work and supervise its construction and installation. The statue was erected in President's Square--later known as Lafayette Square--immediately north of the front entrance to the White House. It was dedicated in 1851, and a second, identical statue was dedicated in New Orleans' Jackson Square in 1856. Subsequently, a third statue was commissioned and dedicated in Nashville in the 1860s, and in the twentieth century a fourth was installed at Pensacola.

Folder 205. Silk ribbon. New Orleans Mechanic's Society Inauguration of the equestrian Statue of Andrew Jackson. 1856 Feb. 9. [New Orleans: 1856] Currently on display in History Galleries. 1 item.

Folder 206. Silk ribbon. Jackson Monument Association. 1856 Feb. 9. Complete text: Jackson Monument Association. Organized 11th, January, 1851. [drawing of statue of Andrew Jackson in Jackson Square.] Joseph Walker, A. D. Crossman, J. B. Plauche, Joseph Genois, Jas. H. Caldwell, Chas. Gayarre, P. Seuzeneau, Commissioners, L. Heyliger, Secretary. Inaugurated 9th February, 1856. [Note: this ribbon is identical to the one in folder 207 except that the one in 207 has the additional title "Screwmen's Benevolent Society" above the text.] Currently on display in History Galleries. 1 item.

Folder 207. Silk ribbon. Screwmen's Benevolent Association. [1856 Feb. 9]. Complete text: Screwmen's Benevolent Association. Jackson Monument Association. Organized 11th, January, 1851. [drawing of statue of Andrew Jackson in Jackson Square.] Joseph Walker, A. D. Crossman, J. B. Plauche, Joseph Genois, Jas. H. Caldwell, Chas. Gayarre, P.Seuzeneau, Commissioners. L. Heyliger, Secretary. Inaugurated 9th February, 1856. [Note: this ribbon is identical to that in folder 206 except for the additional title "Screwmen's Benevolent Association.] Currently on display in History Galleries. 1 item.


Pamphlets and Newspapers


This series consists of pamphlets concerning the U.S. entry into the War of 1812, Jackson's participation in the defense of the Gulf and the Battle of New Orleans, the 1828 campaign issue of the six executed militia men, and Jackson's 1837 farewell address.

Folder 208. Lowell, John (1769-1840). Mr. Madison's War. A Dispassionate Inquiry into the Reasons Alleged by Mr. Madison for Declaring an Offensive and Ruinous War Against Great-Britain. Together with Some Suggestions as to a Peaceable and Constitutional Mode of Averting That Dreadful Calamity. By A New-England Farmer. 1812. (Boston: Printed by Russell & Cutler, 1812.) It begins with an introduction in which the author sets out to prove that the war is being fought "to promote the views of France," and not to "protect the commercial rights and interests of the United States". In the body of the pamphlet, the author examines President Madison's manifesto to Congress, impelling them to declare war, and shows how all his charges against Great Britain are exaggerated; considers the "expediency of the war", whether successful or unsuccessful; explains that the administration must have been considering war many months before announcing it, and had they made this information public, many merchants would not have lost the money or merchandise that the sudden announcement caused; shows that it is the duty of citizens to "abstain from taking a part in [the war]"; and "point[s] out the legal and constitutional remedy to which the citizens may and ought to resort" to stop the war. Much of the author's arguments are based on the effects on trade of Madison's actions before and in declaring war, and on what he considers as Madison's overly close ties with Napoleon Bonaparte. Other topics discussed include British impressment of sailors on American ships, which he defends; blockades set up and decrees made by both France and Great Britain affecting American trade, Madison's response to them, and the author's own defense of British trade imbargoes; why it is in America's best interests to support Britain over France (including that should France conquer Britain, she will try to take back Louisiana), why a war with Britain would hurt America commercially, and why America will lose; the lack of complete support in America for the war; precedents for the duty of people to refuse immoral orders of their rulers; and the peaceable and constitutional means to put an end to the war, such as circulating verbally or in writing one's opinion against the war, assembling and associating with others of like views, sending delegates to government bodies, and voting for those against the war or informing those in office of their opinions. Pages x, [3]-63. 1 item.

Folder 209. Van Ness, William Peter (1778-1826). A Concise Narrative of General Jackson's First Invasion of Florida and of His Immortal Defence of New-Orleans: with Remarks. By Aristides. 1827. Second Edition--with Additions. Published by order of the General Committee of Republican Young Men of New-York. New York: W. M. Murden & A. Ming, Jr., 1 Murray-street, 1827. One instance of underlining and annotation; this copy has been bound. Begins with a preface explaining that as he is one of only two candidates for President, the blameless conduct of Andrew Jackson in New Orleans and Pensacola needs to be put before the American people, and that he should, in fact, "be applauded for his foresight, wisdom, and prudence". The section labeled "Narrative" begins with Jackson's appointment of major general in charge of the Seventh Military District. He goes on to explain Jackson's justification in attacking Pensacola. He continues with Jackson's difficulties in defending New Orleans, which led him to declare martial law; the author defends this based on the conduct of the New Orleanians and describes Jackson's own valor in defending New Orleans, contrasting it with those against him and with the Louisiana legislature, which was advocating surrender. This section includes an account of the Battle of New Orleans, as well as its aftereffects, including a trial of Jackson in a New Orleans court. Much emphasis is put on Jackson's heroism versus the cowardice of those who tried him, and of the public support for Jackson. This is followed by a short life story of Jackson, focusing on his public career. The "Narrative" sums up with a discussion of Jackson's unique qualifications for the office of president. This is followed by an appendix which takes up some points from the Narrative: Note A condemns those supporters of John Q. Adams who were against the War of 1812; Note B is "Address delivered to Major General Andrew Jackson, by the Reverend W. Dubourgh, Administrator apostolic of the diocese of Louisiana" (includes Jackson's reply); Note C is "Address to the troops at New-Orleans, after the annunciation of peace" by Andrew Jackson; Note D discusses the reconciliation of Andrew Jackson and Mr. Crawford, a political opponent. [3], 4-40 p. 1 item.

Folder 210. Binns, John (1772-1860). Monumental Inscriptions. 1828. Philadelphia?: 1828. Original wraps plus 8 leaves. Wrapper titled "Monumental Inscriptions" surrounded by a border of skulls and crossbones. Each of the eight leaves contains text set in an etching of a tombstone; the text is about the six militia men executed under Jackson's command, 1815 Feb. 21, and another man executed under his command at a different time. [Their deaths became a campaign condition in the 1828 Presidential election, with Jackson's opponents essentially accusing him of murdering the militia men by allowing them to be executed for desertion when they had thought their tours of duty ended.] The text takes the form of that of a tombstone (i.e., "Here lies..."); those about the militia men emphasize the injustice of their convictions and executions, based on the fact that they thought their tour of duty up and voluntarily returned to camp when informed otherwise; several mention the men as veterans of the Creek War. Page [1] is "Sacred to the Memory of John Harris", a preacher with nine children, who spent his last days writing his wife. Page [2] is dedicated to "the Mouldering Remains of David Hunt", son of a Revolutionary soldier, who was urged to return to camp by his father. Page [3] is dedicated to Edward Linsey, who returned to camp when others in his party did not. Page [4] is dedicated to Jacob Webb, a poor, uneducated man, who served in the Creek War faithfully. Page [5] is dedicated to "Whatever was mortal of Henry Lewis", who did not die immediately after being shot as did the others, dying later that evening. [Note: other pamphlets and broadsides suggest he lived several days.] Page [6] is dedicated to "the Mortal Remains of David Morrow", who received a conditional pardon from his General but was tried and shot anyway. Page [7] is dedicated to John Woods, an eighteen year-old soldier who disobeyed an order for "a menial duty" while on guard duty; he was tried for disobeying orders and offered a pardon if he enlisted in the Regular Service, but believing his cause just, he refused, and was convicted and shot. Page [8] is "Sacred to the Memory of the Mother of John Woods", and emphasizes Woods' youth when he joined the militia, and the grief of a mother who has lost so young a child. The back of the outside wrapper explains that the preceding inscriptions were "compiled from official documents, communicated by the Department of War to Congress", and urges the American people not to vote for Andrew Jackson because they show him to be unable "to govern his own vehement passions" and is therefore unfit for office. Different edition than that in folder 211; the front of the wrapper in folder 211 contains commentary on the rest of the pamphlet, and the etchings of tombstones are more elaborate; also folder 211 contains no leaf about John Woods alone, only about his mother. Original wraps plus 8 leaves. 1 item.

Folder 211. Binns, John (1772-1860). Monumental Inscriptions. 1828. Philadelphia(?), 1828. Original wrappers plus 7 leaves, in newer binding. Front cover (wrapper) is titled "Monumental Inscriptions" and contains an explanation that the following inscriptions were "compiled from authentic sources, but principally from official documents, communicated by the Department of War to Congress"; they are now printed here so that Americans will know that Andrew Jackson [then running for president against John Q. Adams] "illegally and wantonly shed the blood of his countrymen and fellow soldiers" and is unfit to be president. This is followed by seven leaves similar to those in folder 210, about the six militia men executed under Jackson's command 1815 Feb. 21, and another man executed under his command at a different time. [Their deaths became a campaign condition in the 1828 Presidential election, with Jackson's opponents essentially accusing him of murdering the militia men by allowing them to be executed for desertion when they had thought their tours of duty ended.] Each leaf contains an etching of a tombstone [more elaborate here than that in folder 210, with skulls and crossbones, angels, etc.] around the text, which also takes the form of that of a tombstone (i.e., "Here lies..."); those about the militia men emphasize the injustice of their convictions and executions, based on the fact that they thought their tour of duty up and voluntarily returned to camp when informed otherwise; several mention the men as veterans of the Creek War. The text is nearly identical to that in folder 210, but the leaves are in a different order. Page [1] is dedicated to Jacob Webb, a poor, uneducated man, who served in the Creek War faithfully. Page [2] is dedicated to Edward Linsey, who returned to camp when others in his party did not. Page [3] is dedicated to "the Mouldering Remains of the gallant David Hunt", son of a Revolutionary soldier, who was urged to return to camp by his father. Page [4] is dedicated to "Whatever was mortal of Henry Lewis", who did not die immediately after being shot as did the others, dying "in Extreme Agony" later that evening. [Note: other pamphlets and broadsides suggest he lived several days.] Page [5] is "Sacred to the Memory of John Harris", a preacher with nine children, who spent his last days writing his wife. Page [6] is dedicated to "the Mortal Remains of David Morrow", who received a written pardon from his General but was tried and shot anyway. Page [7] is "Sacred to the Memory of the Mother of John Woods"; Woods was an eighteen-year-old soldier who was tried and shot for disobeying an order; this page emphasizes Woods' youth when he joined the militia, and the grief of a mother who has lost so young a child. On the back wrapper are the general details of the story of the six militia men (that they thought their tours of duty was three months, and left camp to return home, along with hundreds of others, returning when they found their tours of duty were in fact six months, only to be tried for desertion, convicted and shot, despite the fact that Jackson had already received news that the war was over.) Different edition than that in folder 210; this one's front and back wrappers contain commentary on the rest of the pamphlet; that in folder 210 contains commentary only on the back; also that in folder 210 has an additional leaf dedicated to John Woods, with more detail about the order he disobeyed. Original wrappers plus 7 leaves.

Folder 212. Hill, Isaac (1789-1851). New-Hampshire Patriot--Extra. Concord, Monday, October 13, 1828. From the Pennsylvania Reporter. Six Militia Men. Profligacy Exposed!! 1828 Oct. 13. (Concord: New-Hampshire Patriot, 1828.) [Note: the trial and execution of six militia men for desertion under Andrew Jackson's command after the Battle of New Orleans became a campaign issue in the 1828 presidential election between Jackson and the incumbent John Q. Adams, with Jackson's opponents claiming, generally in melodramatic language, that the executions were unwarranted because the men truly believed their tours of duty to be up; many of these accusations of bloodthirstiness or murder were printed in "coffin broadsides".] This extra edition of the New-Hampshire Patriot defends Andrew Jackson against the charges in the coffin broadsides, specifically stating that it intends to refute the charges in those publications published by John Binns. Much of the issue is made up of a letter from Sela Paine, the chaplain who visited the condemned men and witnessed the execution, beginning with a description of how they asked him to visit them for prayer. He states that to his knowledge, no application for clemency was made to Andrew Jackson, and that the decision not to ask for a pardon for the men were made by the officers at that camp; he knows of hundreds of similar cases where Jackson did grant pardons. He describes the prayer service he and another minister held with the men the evening before the execution, and the execution itself. He explains that Lewis was not dead after the first round of shots, and that the officers decided not to shoot him again, but brought him to a doctor; he lived two or three more days, badly injured, but uncomplaining of his fate. He explains that he particularly wanted to state what happened to Lewis because so many lies have been written. Paine states unequivocally that the men were guilty not only in the opinion of the court martial, but also the local officers and soldiers; and that the officers considered a petition for pardon, but decided "it could not be done with a due regard to the safety and subordination of the army". This is followed by the minutes of a meeting of the democratic republicans of the Town of Canterbury concerning the Presidential election, at which they adopted numerous resolutions, among them: that those who say there is no difference between the republican and the federalist parties are attempting to deceive the public; that John Q. Adams' divulgence of a federalist plot to dissolve the Union in 1807 was feigned and that his alleged conversion to republicanism is dishonest and hypocritical; that a frequent change in rulers is necessary, and no one should be president for more than four years; that Andrew Jackson as President "would greatly promote the honor, happiness and welfare of the Nation"; and that they have full confidence in John C. Calhoun [Jackson's vice-presidential candidate]. The issue ends with an extract praising Jackson from a letter written from the widow of [Stephen] Decatur to Jackson, and a song in honor of Jackson taken from the Dover Gazette. Unbound; pages uncut. 8 pp. 1 item.

Folder 213. United States. War Dept. Official Record from the War Department, of the Proceedings of the Court Martial Which Tried, and the Orders of General Jackson for Shooting the Six Militia Men, Together with Official Letters from the War Department, (Ordered to Be Printed by Congress) Showing that These American Citizens were Inhumanly & Illegally Massacred. 1828. (Washington: Printed at the Office of Jonathan Elliot, Pennsylvania Avenue, 1828.) [Note: the trial and execution of six militia men for desertion under Andrew Jackson's command after the Battle of New Orleans became a campaign issue in the 1828 presidential election between Jackson and the incumbent John Q. Adams, with Jackson's opponents claiming, generally in melodramatic language, that the executions were unwarranted because the men truly believed their tours of duty to be up.] The pamphlet contains opening remarks assuring the reader that Jackson, while in New Orleans celebrating his victory, was committing murder by allowing the men to be convicted. This is followed by a selection of documents sent by the Dept. of War to Congress, at Congress' request, intending to show that the Tennessee militia tour of duty was always three months; most of the documents are to or from either Tennessee Governor Willie Blount or the Secretary of War. This is followed by detailed minutes of the1814 Dec. trials of several men accused of mutiny or desertion on 1814 Sept. 20, including witnesses' names and testimony; the following trials took place over several days. Beginning p. 11 is that of Captain John Strothers, 1st Regiment W[est] T[ennessee] militia, who was found guilty and dismissed from the service, barred from serving in the US Army again. Beginning p. 16 is that of Jacob Webb [one of those mentioned in coffin broadsides], a private in Capt. Strothers' company, charged with desertion, mutiny and robbery, found guilty of desertion and mutiny, sentenced to be shot. Beginning p. 17 is that of David Morrow [another from the coffin broadsides], a sergeant in Capt. Strothers' company, charged with mutiny and exciting to mutiny, found guilty, and sentenced to be shot. Beginning p. 18 is that of John Harris, [another name from the coffin broadsides], a private in Capt. Strothers' company, charged with mutiny and conniving at mutiny, found guilty, and sentenced to be shot. Beginning p. 19 is that of Henry Lewis, [another mentioned in the coffin broadsides], a private in Capt. Mebane's company, charged with exciting to mutiny and with mutiny, found him guilty of the first charge and partly guilty of the second, and sentenced him to be shot. Beginning p. 20 is that of David Hunt, [also mentioned in the coffin broadsides], his rank and company not given, but testimony suggesting a member of Capt. Mebane's company, charged with mutiny, found guilty, and sentenced to shooting. Beginning p. 21 is that of Edward Linsey, [also mentioned in the coffin broadsides], a private in Capt. Searcy's company, charged with mutiny and exciting to mutiny, found guilty, and sentenced to death by shooting. Beginning p. 21 is that of 15 men of various companies, charged with desertion and mutiny, to which they all plead guilty, and were sentenced to make up time lost out of camp, put on half pay, and at the end of their service, have half their heads shaved and be drummed out of camp. Beginning p. 22 is the trial of "serjeant" James Nelson, Joseph Routon, A. Whitton, and Robert B. Roberts, privates of Capt. Mebane's company, charged with mutiny for stealing supplies, found guilty and received the same sentence as the previous group of prisoners. Beginning p. 22 is the trial of Private Obadiah McBey of Capt. Strother's company and of Jeremiah Dennis and James Blythe of Capt. Mebane's company, charged with desertion and mutiny, to which they plead guilty, and received the same sentence as the previous group of prisoners. The next trial (beginning p. 22) was that of a group of over 100 men of varying ranks, mostly privates, charged with mutiny, to which they all plead guilty, with the exception of Frederick Rowland, stating they were told by officers their tours of duty were three months; Rowland was found not guilty; the rest were sentenced as the previous groups of prisoners, except that their pay was stopped by one-third, not one-half, with a recommendation to the commanding General that six have the sentence remitted on account of their youth and inexperience. This was followed (beginning p. 23) by the trial of Nathan Johnson, a drummer of Capt. Newland's company, charged with exciting to mutiny and with mutiny; they found him guilty of the first charge and partially guilty of the second, and gave him the same sentence as the group of prisoners above. Next was the trial (beginning p. 23) of 28 men, no rank or company given, charged with mutiny, to which they plead guilty and were sentenced as the previous group. This was followed (beginning p. 24) by the trial of 15 men, charged with mutiny, to which they plead, guilty and were sentenced as those before, with recommendations to the Commanding General that the sentences of Edward Burchett and John Davis be remitted, on account of Burchett's youth and inexperience, and Davis' extreme ignorance. Next was the trial (beginning p. 24) of Capt. A. Roberts of the Mississippi militia, in the service of the United States, charged with conduct unbecoming an Officer and a Gentleman (intoxication and stealing a boat from a civilian), and with conduct highly unmilitary and unbecoming an Officer (seizing a boat from the Camp Boat Yard), found guilty of intoxication and stealing an Army boat (the civilian boat owner claiming he had given it to him), and sentenced to dismissal from the Army. The final trial (beginning p. 25) was that of John Rourke, a private citizen, but no prosecutor appeared and no charges filed, so he was acquitted, ending the court martial proceedings. Next in the pamphlet (p. 26) is "Gen. Jackson's Order for Executing the Men", an order from the General Order book which basically restates all the sentences reached at the court martial above, states the executions should be carried out four days after the order is received in Mobile, and was signed by Robert Butler, Adj. Gen. The pamphleteer comments on the injustice of the sentences, and includes an account by "an eye-witness of the horrid spectacle" other executions [the same as printed in the coffin broadsides], and certificates published by the father of David Hunt (James Hunt) and by John Matthews, Hunt's Captain in the Tennessee militia, both decrying the injustices of the sentences because the men thought they were only in the army for three months, not six. The pamphlet ends with a letter from David Hunt to his parents written after his sentencing, and a short commentary mentioning that the sentenced men were killed after the peace treaty was already signed. [2], 3-32 p. 1 item.

Folder 214. United States. War Dept. Official Record from the War Department, of the Proceedings of the Court Martial which Tried, and the Orders of General Jackson for Shooting the Six Militia Men, Together with the Official Letters from the War Department, Showing that These American Citizens Were Inhumanly & Illegally Massacred. 1828. (Albany, 1828.) [Note: the trial and execution of six militia men for desertion under Andrew Jackson's command after the Battle of New Orleans became a campaign issue in the 1828 presidential election between Jackson and the incumbent John Q. Adams, with Jackson's opponents claiming, generally in melodramatic language, that the executions were unwarranted because the men truly believed their tours of duty to be up.] [This pamphlet is similar to that in 213, but the text seems to be expanded on in some places, edited in others, and with commentary in the form of added footnotes.] It begins with "Preliminary Remarks", accusing Jackson, on account of the executions, of being "an unfeeling Tyrant" who "has done this bloody work"; and states briefly its case that the men executed had finished their tours of duty, which were, in the writer's opinion, three months, and were therefore correct in leaving camp. This is followed by "The Official Documents", in which there is selection of documents sent by the Dept. of War to Congress, at Congress' request, intending to show that the Tennessee militia tour of duty was always three months; most of the documents are to or from either Tennessee Governor Willie Blount or the Secretary of War. After the selection of government documents is "Record of the Court Martial, Mobile, 5th Dec. 1814" (p. 13ff.), containing the minutes of the trials of over 100 men over several days beginning Dec. 5; it includes witnesses' names, ranks, companies, and summaries of their testimony, or in many cases, their own words. The mutiny referred to in most of the trials took place starting on the evening of 1814 Sept. 19, and continuing Sept. 20, when the men left camp. The first tried (p. 13) was Capt. John Strothers, 1st Regiment W[est] T[ennessee] militia, charged with Exciting to Mutiny, Conniving at Mutiny, and Disobedience of Orders; he was found guilty of all charges except failing to report his men to the commanding officer, and was dismissed from the Army, as "unworthy of holding a commission". Next tried (p. 19) was 3d Lieut. James McCauley, 1st Reg[iment] W[est] T[ennessee] militia, charged with Exciting to Mutiny, Conniving at Mutiny, and Disobedience of orders; they found him guilty, sentenced him to dismissal from the Army, to have his sword broken over his head, and to be disqualified from ever again holding an Army commission. This was followed ( p. 22) by the court martial of Jacob Webb [mentioned in the coffin broadsides], a private in Capt. Strother's company, West Tennessee militia, accused of desertion, mutiny (specifically that he was the leader of the mutinous party), and robbery; he was found guilty of desertion and mutiny, and sentenced to death by shooting. The next court-martial (p. 24) was that of David Morrow [mentioned in the coffin broadsides], a Sergeant in Capt. Strother's company, West Tennessee militia, charged with mutiny and exciting to mutiny; the Court found him guilty except for a charge of forcing a guard and killing cattle, and sentenced him to death by shooting. Next tried (p. 25) was John Harris [mentioned in the coffin broadsides], a private in Capt. Strother's company, West Tennessee militia, charged with mutiny and conniving at mutiny; he was found guilty, and sentenced to death by shooting. The next trial (p. 27) was that of Henry Lewis [mentioned in the coffin broadsides], a private of Capt. Mebane's company, charged with exciting to mutiny and with mutiny; the court found him guilty of exciting to mutiny and most of the specifications of the charge of mutiny, and sentenced him to death by shooting. Next ( p. 29) the court took up the case of David Hunt [mentioned in the coffin broadsides], no rank or company given, charged with mutiny; he was found guilty, and sentenced to death by shooting. This is followed (p.30) by the court martial of Edward Linsey [mentioned in the coffin broadsides], a private in Capt. Seary's [note: should be Searcy] company, charged with mutiny and exciting to mutiny; he was found guilty of most of the specifications of the two charges, and sentenced to death by shooting. The next court martial (p. 31) was that of 20 men of the companies of Captains Strother, Mebane, [Searcy] and Kilpatrick, many of whom were witnesses in the preceding trials; they were charged with desertion and mutiny, to which they all pleaded guilty, but asked for mercy because they believed their tours of duty up, and that they were led by "the machinations of wicked men" to leave the service; they were sentenced to make up the time lost from the service, half their pay stopped, and at the end of their service, one half their head was to be shaved close. The court continued (p. 31) with the trials of four privates of Capt. Mebane's company, charged with mutiny; they were sentenced as the previous men, except that only one-third of their pay was stopped. Next (p. 32) was the trial of Obadiah McBey, private of Capt. Strother's company, and Jeremiah Dennis and James Blyth, of Capt. Mebane's company, charged with desertion and mutiny, to which they plead guilty; they were sentenced as the above, but on half-pay. Next (p. 33) the court took up the courts-martial of over 100 men (names listed in pamphlet), charged with mutiny; all but Frederick Rowland plead Guilty, asking for mercy because they "erred through ignorance alone" in thinking their tours up; Rowland was found not guilty; the others were sentenced as the above, with one-third their pay stopped. The next trial (p. 34) was that of Nathan Johnson, drummer of Capt. Newland's company, charged with exciting to mutiny and with mutiny; he was found guilty with the same sentence of the above, one-third of his pay being stopped. This is followed (p. 35 ) by the trial of 28 men, rank and company not specified, charged with mutiny, to which they pled Guilty, asking for mercy because they were ignorant of the law; the court gave them the same sentence as that of Nathan Johnson. The next trial (p. 35) was of 15 men, no rank or company given, charged with mutiny, to which they pled Guilty, asking for mercy because of their ignorance; the court sentenced them as it did Nathan Johnson, but recommended the Commanding General remit the sentences of Edward Burchett, due to his youth and inexperience, and of John Davis, due to his "extreme ignorance". The next trial (p. 36) was that of Capt. A. Roberts of the Mississippi militia in service of the United States, who was charged with conduct unbecoming an Officer and a Gentleman (repeated intoxication and stealing a boat from a civilian) and with conduct highly unmilitary and unbecoming an officer (seizing a boat from the Camp Boat Yard); as the civilian boat owner appeared to say he gave him the boat, Roberts was only found guilty of the first part of the first charge, but guilty of the second charge, and sentenced to dismissal from the US Army. Following the courts martial records are extracts from the general order books (p. 38), most importantly "Gen. Jackson's Order for Executing the Men", in which all of the sentences listed above are repeated, ordered to take place, with the executions to occur four days after the general orders are received in Mobile. The order is signed (in print) by Robert Butler, Adj. Gen. This is followed by commentary on Jackson's lack of mercy (p. 43), an account of the executions supposedly by an eye-witness (p.43) [published in many coffin broadsides], certificates and papers published by the father of David Hunt and his Captain in the Tennessee Militia, John C. Matthews, deploring the injustice of the sentences (p. 44), a letter written by David Hunt to his family after he was sentenced to be shot (p.. 46), and ending with a final commentary pointing out that the executions took place after the peace had already been signed. [2], 3-47 p. 1 item.

Folder 215. United States. War Dept. Official Record from the War Department of the Proceedings of the Court Martial which Tried, and the Orders of General Jackson for Shooting the Six Militia Men, Together with Official Letters from the War Department, (Ordered to Be Printed by Congress) Showing That These American Citizens Were Inhumanly and Illegally Massacred. Fourth edition. 1828. (Fourth edition. Washington, Printed at the Office of Jonathan Elliot, 1828.) [Note: the trial and execution of six militia men for desertion under Andrew Jackson's command after the Battle of New Orleans became a campaign issue in the 1828 presidential election between Jackson and the incumbent John Q. Adams, with Jackson's opponents claiming, generally in melodramatic language, that the executions were unwarranted because the men truly believed their tours of duty to be up.] [This is essentially the same text as that in the pamphlets in folders 213 and 214.] The pamphlet begins with "Preliminary Remarks", accusing Jackson, on account of the executions, of being "an unfeeling Tyrant" who "has done this bloody work"; and states briefly its case that the men executed had finished their tours of duty, which were, in the writer's opinion, three months, and were therefore correct in leaving camp. This is followed by "The Official Documents", in which there is selection of documents sent by the Dept. of War to Congress, at Congress' request, intending to show that the Tennessee militia tour of duty was always three months; most of the documents are to or from either Tennessee Governor Willie Blount or the Secretary of War. [These seem to be different extracts than in other versions of this pamphlet, although from the same documents and with the same sentences italicized.] This is followed by "Record of the Court Martial, Mobile, 5th Dec. 1814". [Note: there were several trials held over a period of several days beginning Dec. 5.] This includes the witnesses' names, ranks, companies, and testimony, sometimes in their own words. The mutiny referred to in many of the trials took place the evening of 1814 Sept. 19 through Sept. 20, when the men left camp. The first trial (p. 11) was that of Capt. John Strothers, 1st Regiment W[est] T[ennessee] militia, charged with Exciting to Mutiny, Conniving at Mutiny, and Disobedience of Orders; he was found guilty except for failing to report his men to his commanding officer, and dismissed from the service. The next trial (p. 15) was that of 3d Lieut. James McCauley, 1st Regiment, W[est] T[ennessee] militia, charged with exciting to mutiny, conniving at mutiny, and disobedience of orders; McCauley was found guilty, and sentenced to be dismissed from the service, have his sword broken over his head, and be disqualified from ever holding a US Army commission again. The next trial (p. 16) was that of Jacob Webb [a subject of the coffin broadsides], a private in Capt. Strother's company, charged with desertion, mutiny, and robbery; he was found guilty of desertion and mutiny, and sentenced to death by shooting. This is followed (p. 17) by the trial of David Morrow [a subject of the coffin broadsides], a Sergeant of Captain Strother's company, W[est] T[ennessee] [militia], charged with mutiny and exciting to mutiny; he was found guilty of all charges except forcing the guard and killing beeves, and sentenced to death by shooting. Next ( p. 18) is the trial of John Harris [a subject of the coffin broadsides], a private of Capt. Strother's company, charged with mutiny and conniving at mutiny; he was found guilty of both charges, with the exception of some specifications of the charges, and sentenced to death by shooting. The next trial (p. 19) was the trial of Henry Lewis [a subject of the coffin broadsides], a private in Capt. Mebane's company, charges with mutiny and exciting to mutiny; he was found guilty of all charges, although not of all specifications of the charges, and sentenced to death by shooting. Next (p. 20) the court took up the case of David Hunt [a subject of the coffin broadsides], no rank or company mentioned, charged with mutiny; he was found guilty and sentenced to death by shooting. The next trial (p. 21) was that of Edward Linsey [a subject of the coffin broadsides], a private in Capt. Searcy's company, charged with mutiny and exciting to mutiny; he was found guilty of both charges, though not of all specifications of the charges, and sentenced to death by shooting. Next (p. 21) the court tried 20 men of Captains Strother's, Mebane's Searcy's, and Kilpatrick's companies, all charged with desertion and mutiny, to which they pleaded guilty, stating they were ignorant of the law and deceived by "the machination of wicked men"; they were sentenced to make up the time they were absent, half their pay be stopped, and at the end of their service, half their heads shaved and drummed out of camp. The next trial (p. 22) was that of Serjeant [sic] James Nelson, Joseph Routon, A. Whitton, and Robert B. Roberts, privates of Capt. Mebane's company, charged with mutiny; they were found guilty, and sentenced to remunerate the government for the time lost by their absence, stoppage of one-third pay, and at the end of their service, have half their heads shaved and drummed out of camp. Next (p. 22) was the trial of Obadiah McBey, a private of Capt. Strother's company, Jeremiah Dennis and James Blythe, of Capt. Mebane's company, charged with desertion and mutiny to which they pled guilty and were sentenced to make up the lost time, half their pay stopped, and on leaving the service, half their heads shaved and then drummed out of camp. The next trial (p.22) was of over 100 men of various ranks and companies, charged with mutiny, to which they pled guilty, except for Frederick Rowland; Rowland was found not guilty; the rest were sentenced to make up the lost time, one-third their pay stopped, and at the end of their service, half their heads shaved and drummed out of camp. The next trial (p. 23) was that of Nathan Johnson, drummer of Capt. Newland's company, charged with exciting to mutiny and with mutiny; he was found guilty of exciting to mutiny and of some specifications of the mutiny charge, and sentenced to stoppage of one third his pay, and at the end of his service, to have half his head shaved and be drummed out of camp. The next trial (p. 23) was that of 28 men charged with mutiny, to which they pled guilty and were sentenced to remunerate the United States for the lost time, stoppage of one third pay, and at the end of their service, to have half their heads shaved and be drummed out of camp. This was followed by the trial of 15 men (p. 24) charged with mutiny, to which they pled guilty, and were sentenced to remunerate the United States for the lost time, stoppage of one third their pay, and when they leave the service, to have half their heads shaved and be drummed out of camp. Next (p. 24) the court took up the case of Captain A. Roberts, of the Mississippi militia in the service of the United States, charged with conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman (repeated intoxication and stealing a civilian's boat) and with conduct highly unmilitary and unbecoming an officer (stealing a boat from the Camp Boat Yard); after the civilian boat owner claimed he gave Roberts the boat, that specification was dropped, but he was otherwise found guilty, and sentenced him to be dismissed from the US Army. Next the court (p. 25) took up the case of a civilian, John Rourke, but as no prosecutor appeared and no charges filed, they dropped the case, and closed the court martial hearings. The next section (p. 26) of the pamphlet is the general orders from the daily order book concerning the sentencing of the prisoners; the sentences are noted in the order book, with Jackson's order that they be carried out and that the executions take place four days after the orders reach Mobile. This is followed (p. 28) by a brief commentary stating that the men executed were "illegally and inhumanly massacred", then by an eye-witness account of the executions [one published on many coffin broadsides], which stresses the injustice of the sentences, the piety of Harris, a preacher, and the bravery of Lewis, who survived the initial shooting, dying in great pain later. The pamphlet continues (p. 30) with certificates and papers of the father of David Hunt and of Hunt's captain in the Tennessee militia, John Matthews, again stressing the injustice of shooting a man who committed an error unwittingly; these include a letter written by Hunt to his family after he received his death sentence. The pamphlet concludes with the observation that the men were killed after the peace treaty had been signed. [2], 3-32 p. 1 item.

Folder 216. 20th Congress, 1st session, House of Representatives. Report. No. 140. Tennessee Militiamen. Report of the Committee on Military Affairs, to which Were Referred the Correspondence and Documents from the War Department, in Relation to the Proceedings of a Court Martial, Ordered for the Trial of Certain Tennessee Militiamen. February 11, 1828. Read, and laid upon the table. 1828 Feb. 11. (Washington: Printed by Gales & Seaton, 1828.) [Note: the trial and execution of six militia men for desertion under Andrew Jackson's command after the Battle of New Orleans became a campaign issue in the 1828 presidential election between Jackson and the incumbent John Q. Adams, with Jackson's opponents claiming, generally in melodramatic language, that the executions were unwarranted because the men truly believed their tours of duty to be up. Most of these were printed in what are now called coffin broadsides, due to their illustrations.] Official report of the House Committee on Military Affairs on the documents concerning the 1814 Dec. 5 court martial of the six Tennessee Militia men at or near Mobile that had become a campaign issue. The Committee begins by stating that it was their understanding that their orders were to review the documents sent by the Department of War, to see that all "necessary to a true understanding of the case" had been sent; if not, to see how "the deficient papers could be supplied"; and to report to Congress whether legislative interference be necessary "as to amendment, either the Rules and Articles of War, or the laws governing the militia of the United States". The Committee reports that letters were sent them out of order, and with some documents missing, which they later procured themselves, in such a way to make them believe someone wished to cause the misapprehension that the Tennessee militia in 1814 and after were mustered into service for three months, when they were, in fact, in for six months. They give a detailed examination of the documents and of the applicable laws, and come to the conclusion that those who sentenced the six men in question to death were completely vindicated, and that, even had the men only been in service for three months, they had committed crimes before those three months were up. They also vindicate Gen. Andrew Jackson, pointing out that although when he signed the death sentences, the Treaty of Ghent had been signed, he had not yet received word of this, and was still apprehensive of further enemy attacks in the Mobile area. They conclude that no legislative interference is needed. This is followed (p. 9) by the documents sent to the House of Representatives by the Department of War, pertaining to this court martial, namely 12 pieces of correspondence between the President or Secretary of War and Governor Willie Blount of Tennessee, concerning terms of drafted militia service. [Note: unlike the anti-Jackson pamphlets, these letters are arranged in chronological order, but with the numbering the War Dept. gave them; i.e., the first document is no. 6.] Beginning p. 24 is "Report of the Adjutant General", which includes a report of the court martial beginning in Mobile 1814 Dec. 5 of over 100 men for mutiny, of which six were the militia men sentenced to death by shooting; and also includes a copy from the General Order Book of the late 7th Military District of the general order in which the sentences given at the court martial are ordered to be carried out. Beginning p. 63 is the report of the Treasury Dept. to the House of Representatives, which includes 1814 musters and pay rolls of companies under the command of Colonel Philip Pipkin: one pay and one muster roll of the Field and Staff; one pay and three muster rolls of Capt. McKay's company; one pay and three muster rolls of Capt. Robertson's company; one pay and two muster rolls of Capt. Blakemore's company; one pay and three muster rolls of Capt. Newlin's company; one pay and three muster rolls of Capt. Newlin's company; one pay and three muster rolls of Capt. Strother's company; one pay and three muster rolls of Capt. Smyth's company; one pay and three muster rolls of Capt. Mebane's company; one pay and three muster rolls of Capt. Kilpatrick's company; and one pay and three muster rolls of Capt. Searcy's company. [These are printed on fold-out sheets bound into the book.] 63 p., [37 tables on folding sheets].

Folder 217. The Friend of Reform and Corruption's Adversary. Monday, June 23, 1828, No. 4. The Six Militia Men. including . Supplement to Friends of Reform and Corruption's Adversary. 1828 June 23. [Cincinnati: Office of the Cincinnati Advertiser, 1828] [Note: the trial and execution of six militia men for desertion under Andrew Jackson's command after the Battle of New Orleans became a campaign issue in the 1828 presidential election between Jackson and the incumbent John Q. Adams, with Jackson's opponents claiming, generally in melodramatic language, that the executions were unwarranted because the men truly believed their tours of duty to be up. Most of these were printed in what are now called coffin broadsides, due to their illustrations.] This pamphlet aims to refute those pamphlets that accuse Andrew Jackson, by publishing the official documents, in their correct order (the accusers' pamphlets print them out of chronological order), and including documents left out by the pamphlets of Jackson's accusers. They reprint the report of the House Committee on Military Affairs (see folder 216), which pointed out that the letters being out of chronological order could cause confusion as to the length of the tour of duty of Tennessee militia men, and came to the conclusion that all those involved in trying the men, sentencing them, ordering the death sentence to be carried out, and executing them, should be vindicated because they were acting correctly and in accordance with the law. Their reprint includes the correspondence sent by the Department of War to Congress, in the order printed in the official report (see folder 216), as well as the Report of the Adjutant General and the extract from the General Order Book of the 7th Military District pertaining to the militia men (see folder 216). At the end is "Supplement to the Friend of Reform and Corruption's Adversary". This includes an essay on "Mr. [Henry] Clay", which largely comments on a visit he made to Baltimore at which he gave a speech and toasts at a private party, which they print here; under "The Speech at Baltimore", they compare it to previous remarks concerning [John Quincy] Adams, showing his "inconsistency"; under "The Madness of Disappointed Ambition", they quote from the speech to show that Clay would rather the country destroyed than Jackson president, and explain why Jackson's military background is not a disqualification for office as Clay claims. The speech is printed here (p. 6 supplement) as an extract from the Baltimore Patriot, followed by uncomplimentary commentaries on the speech and the candidacy of Adams and Clay, also taken from other sources, including a particularly long one by Junius in Cincinnati. (Junius mentions as one of his objections to Adams that he actively opposed making Louisiana a state.) Beginning p. 9 of the supplement is "Jackson Tariff Dinner", description of a dinner given in Pittsburgh in honor of Henry Baldwin by "friends of Domestic Manufactures and the supporters of Andrew Jackson"; the toasts and Baldwin's speech about tariffs that support the western and middle states, "the American System" and Jackson, are included. Beginning p. 15 of the supplement is "Coalition Eloquence", in which two unnamed men respond to charges (made by Henry Clay?) against them that they left the country of their birth because they disliked its government, and are now attacking the government of their adopted country; it is signed "M.D." Beginning p. 17 of the supplement is "Communication to the Citizens of the State of Ohio, No. 2" by Junius in Cincinnati, in which he discusses John Quincy Adams, his father John Adams, and their views on hereditary aristocracy, as well as John Q. Adams' lack of support for the War of 1812. Beginning p. 19 of the supplement is Convention--Eighth District, Ohio, in which Isaac Minor was selected as a candidate for the House of Representatives, in place of Mr. Stanberry [sic]; the article takes an address promoting one of these candidates, and substitutes the name "Gen. Jackson" in order to promote Jackson's presidential campaign. [Note: although his name is spelled Stanberry here, in his official Congressional biography, it is spelled Stanbery. He continued to serve in the House until 1832.] Next (p. 21 of supplement) is a letter from Timothy Pickering to General Philip Van Cortlandt, dated 1828 Apr. 28, in which Pickering gives "a short account of the defence of [New] Orleans", favorable to Jackson, particularly defending him against the often repeated charge of being a "military chieftain.". The final article, "Mr. Cooke", beginning p. 23 of supplement, refutes a charge that Mr. Cooke by supporters of Adams and Clay that Cooke "received $5,500 for going as secret agent to Cuba", saying that at least some of the money was for "vot[ing] for John Q. Adams against the will of his constituents". On the back cover there is an advertisement for an engraved portrait of Andrew Jackson, as well as subscription information. [129]-163, [1]-24+[1] (supplement) p. 1 item.

Folder 218. [Democratic Party. New York. Albany.] The Case of the Six Mutineers, Whose Conviction and Sentence Were Approved of by General Jackson, Fairly Stated: with a Refutation of Some of the Falsehoods Circulated on This Subject. 1828. (Albany: Printed for the Albany Argus, by Webster & Wood, 1828.) [Note: the trial and execution of six militia men for desertion under Andrew Jackson's command after the Battle of New Orleans became a campaign issue in the 1828 presidential election between Jackson and the incumbent John Q. Adams, with Jackson's opponents claiming, generally in melodramatic language, that the executions were unwarranted because the men truly believed their tours of duty to be up. Most of these were printed in what are now called coffin broadsides, due to their illustrations.] The pamphlet begins with an address "To the People of New-York", signed by the General Republican Corresponding Committee of the City of Albany [Note: the Republican Party of 1828 is a precursor to the current Democratic Party], stating that they have seen several pamphlets distributed in New York, some printed in Albany, others in Washington in a manner to look like an official document, which purport to print the official documents in the case of the six militia men, as well as handbills stating the same case; they intend to show that these have edited, rearranged, and simply left out official documents in order to make Andrew Jackson seem to be a murderer. (The 16 committee members are listed on p. 5.) This is followed by "The Case of the Six Mutineers Fairly Stated". They first describe the violent mutinies which took place primarily at Ft. Jackson, but also at Fts. Williams and Strother, [all near Mobile] beginning on 1814 Sept. 19, with the men leaving the camps on the 20th; they also explain the surrounding circumstances, namely the importance of these forts in Jackson's defense strategy at a critical point in the War of 1812. They describe the court martial, explaining out of over one hundred men court martialed in the incidence, these six were proven to be ring-leaders and therefore, the only ones sentenced so harshly; they also explain that, although many state that the men were innocent because they believed their tours of duty up, the date they believed the terms were up was Sept. 20, and the mutiny began on the 19th, when they still believed themselves to be in the militia. The pamphleteers then explain some about the Creek War and the calling out of the Tennessee militia, as pertains to this case, especially the question of how long the men were expected to serve. In this section, they analyze how the Dept. of War documents were printed in previous pamphlets, include other official documents they believe were intentionally left out, and mention others which they have been unable to attain. Next they discuss the Battle of New Orleans, refuting charges that the Gulf Coast was no longer in danger of British attack, that Jackson knew of the peace treaty at the time of the executions, and that the condemned asked him for clemency, and he refused; they particularly point out that he had no legal authority to pardon a death sentence even if he had wished to, and then explain why, had he had the legal authority, it would have been poor military leadership to pardon. The Appendix includes "the Report of the Secretary of War, together with the correspondence transmitted to him by the House of Representatives..." (includes footnotes with comments by the editors of this publication); followed by a selection "from the numerous authentic statements, published within the last year in vindication of Gen. Jackson", including extracts from correspondence with Col. G. C. Russell, who presided over the executions, D. Alexander, who was Adjutant at Fort Charlotte at Mobile at the time of the court martial, the Hon. Edward Livingston, who recounts the arrival of the news of the Treaty of Ghent in New Orleans, F. W. Armstrong, who was in the 24th Regiment US infantry at the Battle of New Orleans, and Maj. Gen. E. P. Gaines, who also served at the Battle of New Orleans. The pamphlet ends with a list of other honored generals who had men shot for mutiny or desertion, including Washington. [2], 3-32 p. 1 item.

Folder 219. Marigny, Bernard(1785-1868). Réflexions sur la campagne du Général André Jackson, en Louisiane, en 1814 et 1815 ... 1848. Complete title: Réflexions sur la Campagne du Général André Jackson, en Louisiane, en 1814 et 1815, par Bernard Marigny, né à la Nouvelle-Orléans en 1785, membre du Comité de Défense nommé par la Chambre des Reprèsentans en 1814; ex-Président du Sénat de la Louisiane; membre de la Convention qui Érigea le Territoire d'Orléans en État, en 1812; et membre de la Convention de 1844 et 1845 qui Donna une Nouvelle Constitution àcet État. ( Nouvelle-Orléans: Imprimerie de J. L. Sollée, Rue de Chartres, no. 137, 1848.) Marigny attempts to correct the impression of most Americans that Louisianians of French descent were not zealous in their defense of New Orleans by discussing those who fought in the Battle, organized committees of defense, etc., trying to make the point that the battle could not have been won without the locals. He includes in his descriptions the actions of many specific individuals, including free people of color. In the course of this, he explains the difficulties in convincing Gen. [Andrew] Jackson to accept the help of the Baratarians, most of whom were pirates under the leadership of the Lafittes. He mentions how well received Gen. Jackson was, but that the French were disappointed at how few supplies (arms especially) the US government could supply for the city. He makes special note of the bravery and industry of the women of New Orleans. In Note 1, he tells the story of a physical altercation between the Anglo-Saxons and the French concerning the sort of dances to be dances at a ball. In Note 2, he discusses the population of New Orleans, computes the number of men who were neither slaves nor too old or infirm to bear arms, points out how many men from New Orleans manned various positions during the Battle, and that most of them were of French or Mediterranean background. In Note 3, he discusses why the legislature did not adjourn sine die ; they would have considered it an act of weakness. In Note 4, he describes the many wonderful qualities of a man named Jean Blanque, a naturalized citizen from France. In Note 5, titled "Louis de Blanc de St. Denis", he explains that when Louisiana became a state, there were those who wanted to name it the State of Jefferson; St. Denis, on hearing a translation of this proposal, armed himself with a barrel of powder, and threatened to blow up the Convention. In Note 6, he describes his own experience of meeting Gen. Jackson before the Battle of New Orleans, and his own battle experience, focusing on the personalities involved and his work as head of the Legislature's defense committee. He describes his family's history of going to war, and denies the allegations made by A. Decouet to Abner Duncan, that he (Marigny) was in favor of Louisiana becoming an English colony, ending with a reprint of a unanimous state Senate resolution testifying to the high regard in which he was held, passed in 1822. Pamphlet is in French. [3]-51+[1] p. 1 item.

Folder 220. New-York American , vol. XIX, no. 1614. 1837 Mar. 10. News included in this issue germane to this collection: p. 1, col. 4, Gen. [Andrew] Jackson attended the inauguration ceremony, despite his recent illness; p. 2, cols. 3-7, the complete text of "Farewell Address of Andrew Jackson to the People of the United States"; p. 3, col. 1, editorial comments criticizing the address. A sampling of other news items in this issue: p. 1, col. 1-2, reply of Treasury Department to complaints against it; p. 1, col. 3, the monopolizing of pilots in New York harbors; p. 1, col. 3, riot at an abolitionist lecture in Poughkeepsie; a variety of shipping news, both national and international, in several places; p. 3, col. 3, stock market news; p. 4, cols. 1-4, summing up of the close of the twenty-fourth Congress; p. 4, cols. 5-7, "Inaugural Address of Martin Van Buren, President of the United States." 4 pp. Acc. no. 2001-94.L. 1 item.


ADDITIONS


The Cook Collection continues to grow. Some additions have been integrated with the series above (these will be indicated by an accession number). More recent additions below may be marked with a temporary number, indicating that they were still being processed or catalogued at the time of this writing. These items may still be available for research.

Folder 221. British Powder Horn. Originally issued by the British Army, approximately 14 inches long. Carved on the horn is the British order of battle prior to their attack on January 8, 1815; British corps and regiments depicted in front of "Rodrigue's Canal" separating British and American forces. It has the inscription "XCV G Rex" of the 95th Rifle Regiment (Prince Consort's Own), and a cartouche with the motto "Celer et Audax." The etched map shows British and American artillery batteries, British Congreve rockets and troops handling scaling ladders, and other details. Though the horn itself likely dates from ca. 1814-15, anomalies in the etched design suggest that it was done much later by someone who was not actually present at the battle. For example, "Celer et Audax" (Swift and Bold) was the motto of the 60th Rifles Regiment rather than the 95th, and it seems unlikely that an ordinary soldier could have had the detailed information about overall troop positions and movements so soon after the British retreat. Yet even as a later commemoration piece, this powder horn is a curious and beautiful artifact legitimately connected to the battle. Acc. no. 2002-36-L. 1 item.

Folder 222. Book. Correspondence between Gen. Andrew Jackson and John C. Calhoun, President and Vice-President of the U. States, on the Subject of The Course of the Latter, in the Deliberation of the Cabinet of Mr. Monroe, on the Occurrences in the Seminole War. 1831. (Washington: Printed by Duff Green, 1831). 52 pp. Acc. no. 2002-51-RL.1. 1 item.

Folder 223. Book. A Collection of Sundry Publications, and Other Documents, in Relation to the Attack Made during the Late War upon the Private Armed Brig General Armstrong, of New-York, Commanded by S. C. Reid, on the Night of the 26th of September, 18143, at the Island of Fayal, by His Britannic Majesty's Ships Plantagenet Seventy-Four, Rota Frigate, and Carnation Sloop of War. 1833. (New-York: Printed by John Gray, 110 Fulton Street, 1833). Inscribed in front from Mrs. Reid to the Hon. L. Woodbury. [55] pp. Acc. no. 2002-73-RL. 1 item.

Folder 224. [Senate report] In the Senate of the United States...The Court of Claims submitted the following Report. To the honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled: The Court of Claims respectfully presents the following documents as the report in the case of Claimants Brig General Armstrong vs. The United States... 1858. 35th Congress, 1st Session, Senate, Mis. Doc. No. 142. (Washington, 1858.) List of documents on front cover: 1. The petition of the claimants as amended. 2. Claimants' brief on petition, with Report No. 139, H.R. 3. United States Solicitor's brief. 4.Certificate of registry and other documents, marked A, B, C, D, E, F, G, exhibited by claimant, and transmitted to House of Representatives. 5. Opinion of the Court ordering testimony to be taken. 6. Depositions presented on the part of the claimant and transmitted to the House of Representatives. 7. Solicitor's brief on the facts. 8. Brief of S. C. Reid, jr., with report of the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs, and brief of Charles O'Conor, counsel for claimants on re-argument. 9. United States Solicitor's brief on re-argument. 10. Opinion of Judges Blackford and Scarburgh adverse to the claim. 11. Judge Gilchrist's dissenting opinion. 150 pp. Acc. no. 2002-106-RL.9.1. 1 item.

Folder 225. [House of Representatives report.] Brig General Armstrong. The Court of Claims submitted the following Report. To the honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled: The Court of Claims respectfully presents the following documents as the report in the case of Claimants Brig General Armstrong vs. The United States... 1858. 35th Congress, 1st Session, House of Representatives, Report C.C. No. 149. (Washington, 1858.) List of documents on front cover: 1. The petition of the claimants as amended. 2. Claimants' brief on petition, with Report No. 139, H.R. 3. United States Solicitor's brief. 4. Certificate of registry and other documents, marked A, B, C, D, E, F, G, exhibited by claimant, and transmitted to House of Representatives. 5. Opinion of the Court ordering testimony to be taken. 6. Depositions presented on the part of the claimant and transmitted to the House of Representatives. 7. Solicitor's brief on the facts. 8. Brief of S. C. Reid, jr., with report of the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs, and brief of Charles O'Conor, counsel for claimants on re-argument. 9. United States Solicitor's brief on re-argument. 10. Opinion of Judges Blackford and Scarburgh adverse to the claim. 11. Judge Gilchrist's dissenting opinion. 192 pp. Acc. no. 2002-106-RL.9.2. 1 item.

Folder 226. Order of [Brigadier General] Wade Hampton to Maj. John Brownson, Aide de Camp, removing the military forces on the Mississippi River to Baton Rouge. 1811 Jan. 16. Gen. Hampton advises Maj. Brownson that the removed troops will have three month supplies and he will be advised when circumstances dictate a further move. [The troops were moved due to the unhealthy conditions at the camp in Mississippi.] 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.1. 1 item.

Folder 227. Free franked envelope cover from Capt. Winfield Scott, U.S.A., to Capt. Edmund P. Gaines. 1811 Dec. Cover addressed to Capt. Edmund P. Gaines, 2nd U.S. Infantry, Fort Stoddert, [Mississippi Territory], and docketed 1811 Dec. 27. [Scott was sent to the New Orleans command after being acquitted in a court martial in Fall 1811.] 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.2. 1 item.

Folder 228. Order of Deputy Judge Advocate, Charles Blanchard, addressed to Lt. Simeon Knight as regards the convening of a court martial. 1812 Jan. 19. Addressed to Lt. Simeon Knight, Natchez, Mississippi Territory, enclosing an extract of the general order to convene at the containment near Washington, [Mississippi Terrritory]. [Blanchard also served as an aide to the Territorial Governor, David Holmes, Mississippi Territory.] 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.3. 1 item.

Folder 229. Account of monies expended by Lt. Joseph G. Totten. 1812 Aug. 1. Summary of expenses incurred by Lt. Totten, [U.S. Corps of Engineers] while making a tour of the nation's coastal defenses. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.4. 1 item.

Folder 230. Order of Brigadier General [W.C.C.] Claiborne acting as Colonel Commanding the Militia of the Mississippi Territory, objecting to any changes in the General Court Martial originally appointed. 1813 Jan. 11. Confirms appointments of Colonel [Leonard Covington of the Dragoons, Colonel [Robert] Purdy of the 4th Regiment of Infantry, Capt. [Daniel] Hughes of the 1st Regiment, and Captain [James] Doherty and Lt. [Simeon] Knight, both of the 1st Infantry, for the Court Martial of Captain A. H. Holmes. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.5. 1 item.

Folder 231. Order of Col. Leonard Covington, Commanding General of the Light Dragoons, to Mr. Gabo for a boat. 1813 Mar. 17. Requests Mr. Gabo at the Natchez Landing to deliver to Lt. [Simeon] Knight one of the public boats put in his charge by Mr. Bigalow. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.6. 1 item.

Folder 232. Order from John Paxton, Commanding the 63rd Regiment, Kentucky Militia, to James Davidson, paymaster. 1813 Apr. 12. Requests payment of two dollars to Capt. William Owsley for repairing a drum. Docketed by Capt. Owsley on the reverse. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.7. 1 item.

Folder 233. Order from John Paxton, Commanding the 63rd Regiment, Kentucky Militia, to James Davidson, paymaster. 1813 Apr. 12. Requests payment of six dollars to Richard Ashlock for services as drum major in the year 1812. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.8. 1 item.

Folder 234. Bounty receipt for Luman B. Phelps when enlisting into the army of the United States. 1813 June 1. Payment of $8.00 to Phelps by Lt. Henry Starr, 37th Regiment of Infantry, and witnessed by Asa McNiel. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.9. 1 item.

Folder 235. Order from Brigade Major William McQueen, 8th Infantry Regiment, Head Quarters, Bay of St. Louis, to Capt. C.[ary] Nicholas, Assistant Adjutant Generals Office, 7th Military District instructing Nichols as to the expiration of the term of enlistments of the forces in his district. 1813 July 26. Advises Capt. Nichols as to the expiration date of the enlistments and the administrative procedures to be followed in their discharge. Also, contains an order to transfer private William Meredith of the 24th Infantry to the 2nd Artillery. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.10. 1 item.

Folder 236. Order from Maj. C.[ary] Nicholas, Assistant Adjutant General, to Capt. S.[imeon] Knight, District Paymaster, to pay the men now in service for one year. 1813 Sept. 17. Capt. Nicholas is directed by the Commanding General that the volunteers now engaged in the service of the United States are to be paid based on the day in which the term of service commenced, any subsequent promotion or commission to the contrary notwithstanding. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.11. 1 item.

Folder 237. Requisition of Brigadier General John Coffee for medicine and medical supplies to be delivered to his Brigade quarter master. [1813 Sept.]. Gen. Coffee asks the Assistant Deputy Quarter Master or his agent at Nashville to furnish the above stated articles at Fayetteville on the 28th Instant [1813 Sept.], packed in boxes convenient to be packed on a horse, and delivered as directed. Surgeon G. P. Fore's signature and that of Col. Robert Dyer's attests to the items requested. [Gen. Coffee was to rendezvous at Fayetteville, TN, in 1813 Sept. with Maj. Gen. Jackson in preparation for the Creek War.] 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.12. 1 item.

Folder 238. A Sale Bill of the estate of John Ballinger, deceased. Sold 30th October, 1813. 1813 Nov.[?]. List of items related to Ballinger's military service that were sold at public auction on October 30 and entered into the records in the November Court of Garrard County, KY. Items sold included four horses, a pair of epaulets, one sword, one dirk, a pair of saddle bags, a vallesse, four saddles and blanket, etc. [Ensign Ballinger served with Dudley's Regiment, 8th Company, Kentucky Volunteer Militia.] 2 pp. Acc. no. 2003.0075.13. 1 item.

Folder 239. Letter from [Brigadier General] Thomas H. Cushing to unknown recipient stating that the matter in question has been properly receipted. 1814 Jan.[?]. Gen. Cushing states that Col. [Bartholomew] Shaumburgh [Aide de Camp to Gov. W.C.C. Claiborne] has the receipt for the seventy dollars transmitted by him and that a duplicate has been forwarded based on his conversation with Col. Shaumburgh of January 18th. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.14. 1 item.

Folder 240. Order of Brigadier General Thomas Flournoy, 7th Military District, New Orleans, to Capt. Simeon Knight to proceed to Washington [DC] with all possible dispatch. 1814 Mar. 26. Capt. Knight is dispatched to Washington, DC to settle his accounts as the 1st Infantry's District Paymaster. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.15. 1 item.

Folder 241. Receipt given to Stephen D. Mayo excusing him from military service due to providing a substitute. 1814 Aug. 26. Lt. David Hicks of a company of Riflemen, 2nd Battalion, 12th Regiment, Virginia Militia, certifies that Mayo has presented an able bodied substitute, Henry Taylor, and is therefore exonerated from his tour of duty. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.16. 1 item.

Folder 242. Letter from [Col.] William Linnard, Quarter Master General, U.S. Army, to Mrss.' Simpson Bukman & Co., proprietors of the Union line at Brunswck [NY] concerning shipments of cannons. 1814 Sept. 5. Col. Linnard confirms the shipment of cannons that are to be forwarded to Capt. Abraham Ten Eyck, Assistant Deputy Quarter Master Genera, as well as four kegs of lead. [In contrast, Gen. Jackson was, simultaneously, complaining bitterly to James Monroe, Secretary of War, that military supplies for the southern frontier were extraordinarily slow in arrival.] 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.17. 1 item.

Folder 243. Letter from [Marquis Francois de Barbe] Marbois to an undisclosed recipient regarding some additions to a publication regarding [Benedict] Arnold and Sir Henry Clinton. 1815 Jan. 13. Marbois states that he is forwarding the extra project that he wants inserted. [Marbois was the author of Complot d'Arnold et Sir Henry Clinton... that appeared in 1816. [Sabin 3302] As French Minister, he also negotiated the sale of Louisiana to the United States in 1803.] 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.18. 1 item.

Folder 244. Order of Col. George C. Ross, Commanding Officer of the 44th Infantry, to Col. Simeon Knight, Quarter Master General, 7th Military District concerning repairs to Fort St. Philip. 1815 June 8. Col. Ross advises Col. Knight that six carpenters will be sent immediately to assist in erecting barracks. [British gun ships destroyed these barracks when attempting to navigate the Mississippi after the Battle of New Orleans.] 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.19. 1 item.

Folder 245. Reimbursement claim of Capt. William Lauderdale for transportation of luggage from October 4, 1814 until July 7, 1815. 1816 Aug. 6. Capt. Lauderdale provides detailed information regarding the transportation of his luggage while supporting the activities of Gens. John Coffee and Andrew Jackson. It is docketed May 30, 1817 by Lauderdale when the funds were received from Howell Tatum, agent for the Department of War. 1 p. Acc. no. 2003.0075.20. 1 item.

Folder 246. An Act for permitting a Trade between the United Provinces and certain Colonies now in His Majesty's Possession. 1814 June 17. Acc. no. 2003.0084.1. 1 item.

Folder 247. An Act to allow British Goods to be exported direct from this Country to the United States of America upon the same Terms as when exported to any Foreign Country. 1817 June 30. Acc. no. 2003.0084.2. 1 item.

Folder 248. An Act to continue, during the present Hostilities with the United States of America, an Act of the Forty-third Year of His present Majesty, for the better Protection of the Trade of the United Kingdom. 1814 May 27. Acc. no. 2003.0084.3. 1 item.

Folder 249. An Act to extend Two Acts of the Forty-fifth and Forty-ninth Years of His present Majesty to American Prizes. 1813 June 3. Acc. no. 2003.0084.4. 1 item.

Folder 250. An Act to prevent Foreign Goods of certain Descriptions being brought from the United States of America into Canada; and to allow a greater Quantity of Worsted Yarn to be exported from Great Britain to Canada. 1812 May 5. Acc. no. 2003.0084.5. 1 item.

Folder 251. An Act to revive and continue, until the Expiration of Nine Months after the Conclusion of the War with the United States of America, an Act made in the last Session of Parliament, to authorize the Importation and Exportation of certain Articles into and from the West Indies, South America, and Newfoundland. 1814 April 19. Acc. no. 2003.0084.6. 1 item.

Folder 252. View of the Town of Ghent, The Netherlands. "Ghent ­ The Corn Quay." Acc. no. 2003.0090.1. 1 item.

Folder 253. "La Ville De Gand" - Map of the Town of Ghent, The Netherlands.6-1/4" x 8-1/2". Acc. no. 2003.0090.2. 1 item.

Folder 254. "Peace Negotiations at Ghent". Engraving by W. J. Edwards, portrait of Henry Clay, with vignette of "Peace Negotiations at Ghent" approximately 6-1/2" x 10". Acc. no. 2003.0090.3. 1 item.

Folder 255. Newspaper. “Niles’ Weekly Register” 1815 February 25. Contains the text of an address by President Madison to the Congress concerning the Ghent Treaty and the country's return to peace, as well an address by Jackson to his troops in New Orleans, dated 21 January, 1815. Other reports concern various actions fought late in the war. Acc. no. 2002-91-L.2. 1 item

Folder 256. [Major General] Andrew Jackson, Fort Jackson, [Mississippi Territory] to Doctor W[illiam] Wynne, Fort Williams, [Mississippi Territory]. 1814 July 17. Jackson acknowledges receipt of a letter from Wynne and commends him for his charity towards an orphaned Cherokee girl left at the fort. Acc. no. 2003.0281. 1 item.

Folder 257. Military General Service medal issued to Samuel Smith, 1st Battalion, 7th Regiment of Foot (Royal Fusiliers), with four clasps: Vittoria, Pyrenees, Orthes, and Toulouseca. 1847; silver with grosgrain ribbon. Acc. no. 2004.0300.1. 1 item. 3D objects stored separately.


Folder 258. Naval General Service medal with clasp for "Boat Service" (i.e. Battle of Lake Borgne, 14 Dec. 1814), awarded to James Trill of the ship’s company of HMS Trave; ca. 1847; silver with grosgrain ribbon. Acc. no. 2004.0300.2. 1 item. 3D objects stored separately.


Folder 259. E. M. Pakenham Order. 1810 January 9. Brief autographed order from the Peninsular Army in Coimbra, Portugal, regarding the destruction of a sick mule, appended to the initial examination certificate, and a subsequent notation by Pakenham's aid-de-camp that the order has been carried out. Acc. no. 2005.0204. DS. 1 item.


Folder 260. Captain Francis Newman, Fort Petits Coquilles, to the Commander of the British Cartel. 1815 February 1. Newman explains why his battery had fired upon a British prisoner exchange vessel that had violated the terms of the cease-fire by crossing a defined line near the Rigolets. Acc. no. 2006.0111.1. ALS. 1 item.


Folder 261. Lt. Col. Andrew Pickens, Columbia South Carolina, to Robert Brent, Esq., Paymaster General [United States Army], Washington City. 1813, June 10. Lt. Col. Pickens, of the 10th U.S. Infantry, describes his difficulties in documenting and paying his regiment's expenses, particularly the bounties for enlisted militiamen. Acc. no. 2006.0111.2. ALS. 1 item.


Folder 262. Report of Major William Martin, Camp Coffee [Mississippi Territory]. 1814 October 17. Major Martin, of the Tennessee Militia's Second Regiment, reports on the security of the encampment on October 16, during which Martin served as Officer of the Day. Acc. no. 2006.0111.3. DS. 1 item.


Folder 263. English-made Andrew Jackson souvenir snuffbox. Ca. 1816. Enamel black over wood, attached engraving with a portrait of Jackson in uniform and an inscription above and below the image: "Major General Andrew Jackson / Butt-le of New Orleans, 8th Jany. 1815." The misspelling was apparently intentional. While the maker is unknown, the portrait may be based on an earlier likeness executed in 1815 by Jean-François de Vallée. Acc. no. 2006.0312. 1 item. Note: 3D objects stored separately.


Folder 264. Lord Palmerston (father of the future PM) to Harry Stewart, brother-in-law of the Duke of Wellington. 1801 February 2. Palmerston comments on the health and mental illness of King George III, and the effects on England's government. Acc. no. 2006.0313. ADS. 1 item.


Folder 265. Senator Timothy Pickering to John C. Smith. 1804 January 1. The letter describes a disagreement between Brig. Gen. James Wilkinson and Col. Thomas Butler, late of Tennessee and a close friend of Andrew Jackson. Acc. no. 2006.0313.2. ALS. 1 item.


Folder 266. Report by Secretary of State James Madison on renewed British impressments of American seamen and other matters. 1806 February 6. Acc. no. 2006.0313.3. DS. 1 item.


Folder 267. John Armstrong [U.S. Minister to France] to Fulwar Skipwith [U.S. Consul in Paris]; 1807 June 15. Armstrong criticizes Skipwith regarding the use of improper channels in approaching the French government. Acc. no. 2006.0313.4. ALS. 1 item.


Folder 268. British Indenture Certificate for Merchant Seaman. 1811 March 19. Indenture of James Barley binding him to Thomas Hoult for three years as an apprentice seaman, and dictating the terms of conduct and pay governing both parties. Acc. no. 2006.0313.5. DS. 1 item.


Folder 269. British Admiralty Office Circular Letter. 1811 July 6. A printed and signed circular addressed “To the Respective Captains and Commanders of His Majesty’s Ships and Vessels, officially reducing the submission of logbook copies to the Admiralty Office to twice yearly, issued by the Secretary of the Admiralty, John Wilson Croker. Acc. no. 2006.0313.6. DS. 1 item.


Folder 270. Manuscript plan and description of improved British landing craft. [N.D. 1812]. Undated and unsigned plan and detailed description of a new, safer and more efficient landing craft, operated by hand-cranked paddlewheels. Acc. no. 2006.0313.7. MS. 1 item.


Folder 271. British Memorandum regarding an impressed American seaman. 1812 March 12. Admiralty request to Captain [Bertie Cornelius] Cator of HMS Sloop Acteon to report on the status of John Nugent, who had been impressed from an American vessel, but who “may have accepted His Majesty’s bounty” for service. Acc. no. 2006.0313.8. DS. 1 item.


Folder 272. U.S. Treasury Circular Letter. 1812 July 8. Circular to [Port] Collectors issued by Richard Rush, U.S. Comptroller in the Treasury Department, regarding trade with the enemy. Acc. no. 2006.0313.9. DS. 1 item.


Folder 273. Thomas Forster letter regarding news of the declaration of war. 1812 July 16. Englishman Thomas Forster writes to Mellar Cragie & Co. in Nassau, Bahamas, alerting them to the declaration of war just reported in Bermuda via Halifax. Acc. no. 2006.0313.10. ALS. 1 item.


Folder 274. American privateer license form. [N.D. 1812?]. Blank printed U.S. form to be used as a Letter of Marque and Reprisal, the document issued by governments to private vessels of war (privateers). Acc. no. 2006.0313.11. 1 item.


Folder 275. Alexander Dallas notes on maritime rights. 1812 October 24. U.S. Attorney General for the Eastern District of PA, Alexander J. Dallas, provides a lengthy answer to two legal questions regarding laws of the open seas and respecting neutral ports and “Alien enemies.” Acc. no. 2006.0313.12. ALS. 1 item.


Folder 276. John Armstrong letter regarding the manufacture of arms. 1813 March 19. Secretary of War Armstrong writes to Callender Irvine, Commissary General, asking him to contract with individual arms manufacturers to supply the militias. Acc. no. 2006.0313.13. ALS. 1 item.


Folder 277. Document concerning reward for apprehension of a Tennessee Militia deserter. 1813 April 27. Report requesting payment of $4.25 to Sergeant John Lewis for apprehending a deserter the previous January, as approved by Capt. Michael Molton, Col. John Coffee, and Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson. The document is dated initially 1813 January 10, at Camp Good Exchange. Acc. no. 2006.0313.14. DS. 1 item.


Folder 278. Affidavit concerning detention of Spanish deserters in New Orleans. 1813 May 10. Document from the Attorney General’s Office in New Orleans describing the circumstances of the arrest of eight sailors and two soldiers from the Spanish brig of war La Prosperina. Signed by New Orleans mayor Nicholas Girod and Spanish consul Diego Morphy. Acc. no. 2006.0313.15. DS, Spanish and English. 1 item.


Folder 279. Sixth Military District pay receipt. 1813 June 30. Receipt of funds for pay, forage and subsistence issued to Col. Francis K. Huger, Adj. Genl., 6th Military District, headquartered in Charleston, S.C. Acc. no. 2006.0313.16. ADS. 1 item.


Folder 280. Articles of war for British privateers. 1813 July 14. Printed instructions for Commanders of private vessels of war, certified as genuine by Henry H. Cogswell, the Deputy Provincial Secretary in Halifax, and directed to James Ross, commander of the Private Armed Sloop Dart. Acc. no. 2006.0313.17. DS. 1 item.

Note: More manuscript additions coming soon!  Keep checking for updated content.

WILLIAM C. COOK WAR OF 1812 IN THE SOUTH LIBRARY

In addition to collecting original manuscripts and rare prints, Mr. Cook amassed a considerable reference library on the War of 1812, the Creek War, and related subjects. A PDF inventory of the library is available below.

Library Inventory (PDF)


Original collection guide prepared by Nancy Ruck; series notes supplied by William C. Cook; editing and HTML conversion by Jason Wiese.  For questions about this collection, contact Jason Wiese.
Last update 01.22.07

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